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Architecture

100 Drawings

Using a fixed format of 9" x 9" paper, we will do a drawing each day of the term in a process which will parallel Georges Perec's Life: A User's Manual. Each drawing will have a set of constraints from which the student must extrapolate an image. A narrative will gradually be built through the accumulation of evidence. A varity of media, techniques and strategies will be explored, as well as strategies of invention, and methodologies of ordering. Prerequisites: Submission of an image and a text to explain your interest.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC4118.01

3 Houses 3 Sites

Using the constraints of a minimal house, students will design three dwellings for three distinct sites: A single, detached house in rural Vermont; a two-family in the town of North Bennington; and a six story walk-up in New York City. In each project, the site analysis and mapping will provide the fundamental tools for developing spatial organization, form, materials, and orientation. Each proposal will be presented with fully developed design drawings and models. In addition to studio assignments, weekly readings will be assigned that expand on the themes of the history of dwelling, landscape and architecture. Prerequisites: ARC2101 Architecture I.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4150.01

Adaptations

This studio will begin with a day-long charrette to generate a design for a single family house. Over the course of the following weeks, the design will then be subjected to a sequence of significant modifications requiring an adaptive response. Each shift will be accomplished over a two week period, during which each student will adapt their project to the new requirements. The changes will encompass the full spectrum of architectural criteria, from site, to materials, to program. In each case, an essential test of the success of the solution will be the degree to which the new criteria have been satisfied, while maintaining the spirit of the initial concept. Prerequisites: Prior work in Architecture.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2010 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4104.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4104.02

Advanced Architecture

This is an advanced studio class for students who have a proficient understanding of architectural concepts, history, and theory. Prerequisites: Three Architecture Studios or permission of the instructor.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC4401.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2014 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC4401.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4401.01

Architectural Analysis

Students will select a critically significant building from the history of architecture. After careful research and documentation, a detailed analysis will be made, resulting in critical drawings, diagrams and models. A final project will then be formulated for a new building, generated from the discoveries that emerged through the analysis. Prerequisites: Prior work in architecture, or permission of the instructor.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4157.01

Architectural Graphics

An introduction to a broad range of drawing techniques, including observational drawing, diagrammatic sketching, and geometric constructions. We will also master the conventions of architectural drawing, from plans and sections to three-dimensional projections. Weekly workshops and drawing assignments are required. Prerequisites: None.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2010 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC2104.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC2104.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2013 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC2104.01

Architectural Light

Light and architecture partner in shaping the appearance and our experience of all structures and spaces. This course will explore the interaction and interrelationship of light and architecture, from the perspectives of aesthetics, functionality and economics. Topics will include human vision and perception, color science of light sources, human factors in lighting design, daylight, developing lighting design ideas and approaches, applications of lighting technology, lighting considerations for different kinds of spaces, lighting for visual impact, and energy efficiency. Course work will consist of readings, demonstrations and discussions in class, and weekly assignments. Prerequisites: None.

  • Michael Giannitti | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DRA2238.01
  • Michael Giannitti | SP2013 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | DRA2238.01

Architecture I

Introduction to the discipline of architectural exploration. Architecture I focuses on the formation of architectural concepts through the development of spatial investigations using scale models and drawings. We begin with a series of abstract exercises which explore ways in which meaning is embedded in form, space, and movement. These exercises gradually build into more complex architectural programs organized around particular problems. In the second half of the term, a small architectural project will be developed on a campus site, with the final presentation of measured drawings and a scale model. Prerequisites: ARC2104 Architectural Graphics or permission of the instructor.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC4110.01

Architecture I - Elements

Introduction to the discipline of architectural exploration. Architecture I focuses on the formation of architectural concepts through the development of spatial investigations. using scale models and drawings. We begin with a series of abstract exercises which explore ways in which meaning is embedded in form, space and movement. These exercises gradually build into more complex architectural programs organized around particular problems. In the second half of the term, a small architectural project will be developed on a campus site, with the final presentation of measured drawings and a scale model. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: ARC 2104 Architectural Graphics.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC2101.01

Architecture I - Transformations

This course will focus on the process of drawing and modeling as vehicles for discovering alternative worlds. The drawings and models become the 'program' which define the limits and possibilities of architectectonic invention. Each studio project is intended to provide a catalyst for the next. They will use a variety of strategies and source materials for inspiration, including texts, maps and found objects. Methods will include diagramming, projections, collage, superposition, plaster casting, and photography, among others Weekly assignments will become the foundation for a final architectural proposal for a new building on a site on Main Street in Bennington, employing both screens and projections. Prerequisites: ARC2104 Architectural Graphics, or permission of the instructor.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2011 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC4101.01

Architecture I- Elements

Introduction to the discipline of architectural exploration. Architecture I focuses on the formation of architectural concepts through the development of spatial investigations. using scale models and drawings. We begin with a series of abstract exercises which explore ways in which meaning is embedded in form, space and movement. These exercises gradually build into more complex architectural programs organized around particular problems. In the second half of the term, a small architectural project will be developed on a campus site, with the final presentation of measured drawings and a scale model. Prerequisites: Maps, Diagrams and Projections.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC4115.01

Architecture Seminar

This seminar will read a range of foundational texts underpinning architectural theory. Active participation in class discussions is required. Brief, but well crafted responses will be submitted each week, as well as a final research paper. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2010 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | ARC2111.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2012 | Th, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC4211.01

History of Architecture

Architecture is a synthesis of a broad range of disciplines across the liberal arts. Vitruvius, writing in the first century, stated that a good building needed to satisfy three core principles: Firmness, Commodity, and Delight. This course will elucidate the ways in which these principles have been understood, and manifest over time. In addition to exploring the spatial experience of architecture through slides and film, we will also read brief essays each week to highlight the ways in which aesthetic, socio-economic, philosophical and psychological theories have influenced its development. Students will be expected to participate in class discussion. Weekly responses to the readings are required, in addition to a comprehesive final presentation of a significant building. Prerequisites: None.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2010 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | ARC2110.01

Maps, Diagrams, and Projections

This is an introductory drawing workshop for students interested in architecture. There are at least four categories of drawing that will be developed. The first will concentrate on direct observation - form, light, shadow, texture, color. The second will explore analytical diagramming. We will investigate methods of organizing and mapping visual information.The third is based on the conventions of projection, including descriptive geometry (plan, section and elevation) and constructed perspectives. The fourth will be based on speculative, imaginary or visionary drawings. In each class, there will be a workshop, followed by a drawing assignment. In addition, students will maintain visual journal. Associated Readings will explore the history of architectural drawing. Prerequisites: None.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2013 | W, 9:00AM-12:00PM | ARC2113.01

Nature and Artifice - A History of Architecture

Because architecture seeks to establish a degree of permanence in the world, it is by definition, not natural, a work of human artifice. But our structures are very much of the earth, and the history of architecture is a record of the manifold ways in which cultures have understood, and responded to, their relationship to nature. This course will explore the ways in which the natural world has been interpereted and modeled through slides and lectures. Weekly readings on the history of architecture are required. Students will be expected to participate in class discussion. Weekly responses to the readings are required, in addition to a comprehesive final presentation. Prerequisites: None.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC2112.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2011 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | ARC2112.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC2112.01

Species of Spaces

Using George Perec's story, this studio will explore strategies of describing the physical world, with an emphasis on the elements of rooms, buildings, cities and maps - both real and imagined. Working out from the sheet of paper, and gradually working up into larger scales, we will follow Perec's process, reaching the scope of the city, the world and beyond. Weekly drawing assignments will be tuned to exploit the qualities of these various spaces. Students will work in a range of media and techniques, including the use of traditional architectural projections. Prerequisites: None.

  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC2130.01

The Interstitial: Boundaries, Screens and Gaps

This course will investigate the nature of that which divides two realms. We will look at conditions at multiple scales, from the physical dividers between inside and outside, to the political divisions that demarcate separate territories. How do these dividers operate, and how can they become important participants in shaping the relationship between the realms? Students will propose, and construct screens/walls which serve as mediators between separate conditions. Projects by Lebbeus Woods, including ""The Wall Game,"" and the Bosnia ""Metastructure"" will be important references, as well as the confessional and the mailroom. Prerequisites: Advanced work in three dimensional visual arts.

  • Donald Sherefkin | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | ARC4108.01

Thematic Workshop for Visual Arts: Utopia

"A Map of the World that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at" Lewis Mumford, The Story of Utopias Imagining the ideal has long been a driving force behind artistic endeavor from painting and sculpture to architecture and urban planning. We will explore the ways in which artists and creative thinkers have addressed concepts of the ideal through the formation and projection of grand designs - incorporating visions of both social/cultural and formal/aesthetic transformation. Our considerations will include: Idealized communities, humanist allegories, artists' cooperatives, educational proposals and the invention of alternative worlds. This course is intended for experienced student artists with a firm commitment to serious work in the studio. Although students will be asked to respond to questions presented in class, emphasis will be placed on self-directed projects, which support the development of an individual voice. A strong work ethic and the ability to think clearly and speak articulately about one's own work and the work of others will be emphasized. There will be regular group critiques, individual reviews, required readings and visiting artist lectures. Students may elect to generate work in any medium. Prerequisites: Two courses in visual art and permission of the instructors.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4175.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4175.01

Twisted Siblings: Painting & Architecture

Architecture and painting are two of the oldest forms of societal expression and have been historically linked in complex and dynamic ways. In the 20th century, the movements of Cubism, Futurism, Neo-Plasticism, and Constructivism exemplified vigorous relationships between painting and architecture. The course seeks to create new connections between the two disciplines in the 21st century. We will begin by examing the spatial principles of paintings by a select group of modern and contemporary artists. Each student will select a painting, and analyze it through drawing, modeling, and writing. In addition to making, students will be asked to research ideas and projects of related interest. The results of the initial investigations will be synthesized in a series of small-scale pavilion spaces. The final deliverables will consist of a model, drawings, photographs and a related text. Prerequisites: Prior work in Architecture or permission of instructor.

  • Anthony Titus | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ARC4215.01

Ceramics

Advanced Ceramic Projects

The process of making artwork will be the major focus of the class. This studio class is designed to support the development of the creative process in ceramics with an understanding lending itself to all forms of art making. Projects will be conceptually based requiring investigation on an individual level. Issues to be raised in this class will include functional and sculptural forms relating to the history of ceramic objects. There will be emphasis on the artist as one participating in a larger cultural context. Each student will be required to give a presentation on issues of interest to them in the arts and its relationship to their own work in development during this class. Senior students will also complete written statements about their work and began to learn how to put together a portfolio of visual material. Prerequisites: A minimum of four terms of ceramics and permission of the instructor.

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4385.01

Advanced Slip Casting Project

This is an intermediate/advanced course for developing casting methods for making functional or sculptural ceramic components for mixed media projects. The focus will be on designing prototypes in various materials and investigating how specific aesthetics or functions can be achieved through the material transformation of ceramics. We will explore creating complex forms by designing modular sculptures for interior architecture, utilitarian purposes, or installation components. Students are encouraged to bring an inter-disciplinary approach to bear on the project. A research assignment will be incorporated in this course to assist in the conceptual development. Basic knowledge of clay mixing, glaze application and firing is required for this class. Prerequisites: Introduction to Slip Casting and Mold Making.

  • Yoko Inoue | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER4103.01

Beginning Potters Wheel

This class is an introduction to using the potters wheel as a tool for generating clay forms with an emphasis on pottery making. While focusing on the development of throwing skills, students will explore various possibilities for assembling wheel-thrown elements and will experiment with both functional and non-functional formats. Students will be introduced to the whole ceramic process from wet working, to glazing and finally firing. Slide lectures and discussions will contribute to the projects. Prerequisites: None. Prerequisites: None.

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2011 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2107.01
  • Aysha Peltz | SP2013 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2107.01
  • Aysha Peltz | SP2012 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2107.01
  • Aysha Peltz | SP2014 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2107.01
  • Aysha Peltz | SP2014 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2107.02

Ceramic Multiples in Installation Art

This course focuses on the analysis of clay as a sculptural medium and how we can place the work in the field of the contemporary art. Students will work with the instructor as associates in conceiving ideas for a thematic installation exhibition or will work independently to create a site-specific installation of their own. The main component of the installation must be cast ceramics. We will be producing multiples by exploring various casting methods, applying alteration techniques and experimenting with prototype making. Students will also be encouraged to incorporate various construction methods by combining other mediums and bring an inter-disciplinary approach to bear on the project. A research assignment will be incorporated in this course to assist in the conceptual development. Basic knowledge of mold making and casting is required for this class or the student must be willing to commit to studio time outside the class to achieve necessary technical competence. Technical guidance will be provided. Prerequisites: Introductory level ceramics and/or systemic molds, or permission of the instructor.

  • Yoko Inoue | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER4230.01

Contained- Lidded Jars

In this ceramics class we will explore utilitarian and metaphorical concepts of containment through the making of lidded jars. These forms offer students the opportunity to solve the engineering problem of having two forms come together to make one while also presenting the wonderful challenge of making an interactive art object that requires the hand to engage with the piece to enter the inside. There will be a focus the history of lidded jars for use and ritual. Students will be expected to learn the ideas, skills and formal vocabulary associated with lidded jars and to engage their "engineering mind" in translating their ideas into successful jars. Discussions and readings will address formal and conceptual issues in the work including scale, audience and use. Students will be expected to engage more fully in the whole ceramic process by choosing their building methods and firing their own work, in groups, under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: one college level ceramics class

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2014 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4126.01

Foundations in Ceramics: Roots of Forms

Exploring the unique, material nature of clay as a medium for personal and visual expression will be the focus of this course. All ceramic forms, whether sculptural or utilitarian require a basic knowledge of the ceramic medium and a variety of construction methods will be introduced employing both hand building and wheel techniques to achieve this goal. Emphasis will be placed on developing a language relating historical references, contemporary movements and technical skills. Primary techniques including coil building and throwing will be explored with the vessel form as the primary focus. Formal issues such as composition, form and surface developments as well as concerns of use and content will be addressed throughout the term in a number of diverse projects. Regular demonstrations slide presentations and critiques will increase exposure to the possibilities of this tradition. Students will participate in all aspects of the ceramic process including clay mixing, slip and glaze preparation and the loading and firing of kilns. Some materials will be required to be purchased; these include a manual, dust masks, plastic bags and basic ceramic tools. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2112.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2010 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2112.01

Foundations in Ceramics: The Hand as a Tool

Exploring the unique, material nature of clay as a medium for personal and visual expression will be the focus of this course. All ceramic forms, whether sculptural or utilitarian require a knowledge of the basic skills and an understanding of clay. A variety of construction methods will be introduced employing handbuilding techniques. Emphasis will be placed on developing a personal language with the material. Formal issues such as composition, form and surface developments as well as the concerns of use and content will be addressed throughout the term in a number of diverse projects. Regular demonstrations, slide presentations and critiques will increase your exposure to the unlimited possibilities within this tradition. Students will participate in all aspects of the ceramic process including clay mixing; slip and glaze preparation; and the loading and firing of kilns. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2105.01
  • Barry Bartlett | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2105.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2105.01
  • Barry Bartlett | SP2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2105.01

Fundamentals of Spatial Thinking and Making

Objects guide and define human activity and interactions. On a daily basis, we encounter and navigate thousands of manipulated spatial conditions, from highways, to landscapes, to tableware. How our dimensional reality shapes our experiences is defined by our ability to engage, understand and even alter these conditions. This is a foundational course in three dimensional art. Students will learn to observe, interpret, and make art objects through a series of projects in both the ceramic and sculpture disciplines. Central to this process will be the study of history, drawing, and learning to use various tools and materials. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2012 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01

Gas & Electricity

This course will explore high temperature firing in both reduction and oxidation. Each assignment in this class will generate two pieces which will be fired separately to discover the differences between these atmospheric effects. Projects will include an emphasis on creating rough, smooth, and varied objects to investigate the effect of different surfaces to which glaze is applied. Additionally, glaze formation and testing will be a component of this class. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jesse Potts | SP2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2117.01

Hand-Building Ceramics

This is an introductory course to learn basic hand-building techniques for making functional or sculptural ceramic objects. Coil building and slab construction techniques to achieve various structural forms will be introduced. Through several diverse assignments, we will practice various constructing techniques to develop skills. Students are expected to conceive of two projects based on a given theme and to complete the work for midterm and final presentations/class critique. We will learn how to apply research in art and history in ceramics to creative projects. Drawing/sketchbook assignments will be given throughout this course to develop conceptual approaches and skills for organizing of ideas. Basics of material, glazing and firing techniques will be incorporated in the class. Prerequisites: None.

  • Yoko Inoue | FA2010 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2102.01

Introduction to Slip Casting

This is an introductory course to basic mold making and slip casting techniques for producing multiple components to create sculptural ceramic objects or a series of functional ware. This course focuses on the development of design concept through exploration of various casting methods, applying alteration techniques and experimenting with prototype making. Basic preparation of the material, glaze application and firing techniques will be introduced. Prerequisites: None.

  • Yoko Inoue | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2168.01
  • Yoko Inoue | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2168.01

Low Fire Clay and Glazes, History & Application

This class will explore the use of low temperature clay and glazes. A large part of ceramic history is based in these materials. All early civilizations moving into the 14-century and many contemporary styles depend on low temperature material in terms of both technical and artistic style. Students will be asked to do research into different styles and types of low fire clay and glaze. Each student will give a presentation slide lecture on the subject they choose to research. Students will then formulate and test clay and glazes and create three-dimensional pieces in the ceramic medium from the research completed. Techniques could include low fire white and terra cotta clays, underglazing, decals and lusters. Some books will be required to be purchased as text for this course. Prerequisites: CER 2104 Introduction to Ceramics or permission of the instructor.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2013 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4328.01

Low-Fire / Contemporary Practice I

This class will investigate the possibilities of ceramics in the temperature range below 2100 F. Students will gain experience with methods as diverse as reduction-cooled lusters, sagger firing, and brilliantly colored low-fire glazes. Along with regular lectures, students will research and present on a contemporary ceramic artist. Though the course is focused on introducing new techniques, exploration will be project based. Framed by criteria specific to each project, evaluation will be based as much on content as craftsmanship. Prerequisites: None.

  • Chad Gunderson | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2140.01

Low-Fire / Contemporary Practice II

This course will continue the investigation of low-temperature ceramics started with "Low-Fire / Contemporary Practice I," but new students are welcome as well. Students will gain experience with methods such as china painting, printmaking with ceramics, and using ceramic decals. Along with regular lectures, students will research and present on a contemporary ceramic artist. Though the course is focused on introducing new techniques, exploration will be project based. Framed by criteria specific to each project, evaluation will be based as much on content as craftsmanship. Prerequisites: None.

  • Chad Gunderson | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2150.01

Naked Clay

This intensive seven-week course will concentrate on the potential of the raw clay surface while focusing on the essentials of clay formulation. Students will discover how to achieve rich and varied ceramic surfaces without the use of glaze. Coursework will include lectures and experimentation ranging from low-fire to high-fire temperatures with a variety of oxidation and reduction atmospheres. The goal of this course is for students to develop a fundamental knowledge of clay materials while at the same time exploring surfaces for functional and non-functional ceramics. Prerequisites: None.

  • Chad Gunderson | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2125.01

Observation, Interpretation, and Construction

This class will investigate natural structures as a way to create form and surface. We will study organisms from the animal and plant kingdoms, investigating how they build structures such as hives, nests, tunnels, reefs, shells, growth structures of trees, plants, seedpods and other natural growth patterns. This research will lead to students proposing a concept and method for the production of a series of objects, including functional tableware, architectural forms and systems, and sculpture. Students will be asked to research an artist who has used nature as a strong influence in their work and give a presentation on the artist during the term. Students will be expected to include drawing as part of the class. The purchase of drawing and drafting paper will be required. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2220.01

Political Ceramics

This class will investigate the nature of making objects that address current political issues relating to the upcoming presidential election. Students will be asked to explore and identify culturally held meanings, values, and imagery stemming from the political discussion of our national debate leading up to the November election. From these discussions students will create work that represents their own beliefs and reflections in ceramic form. The class will study historical and contemporary artists who have used political issues to inform and shape their work. Research will not be limited to the ceramic medium. Students will be expected to research relevant artists and make a presentation, as well as to complete a politically based ceramic body of work. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2012 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4210.01

Set the Table - Tableware Design

Throughout history, tableware has been an expression of a specific time and place. In this way utilitarian objects embody the ideas that define culture. For this class students will produce prototypes that are a thoughtful response to this problem. The emphasis will be on designing compelling pots rather than producing many matching sets. Students will be expected to combine throwing, coil building, slab building and simple molds to make their pieces. Discussions will address formal and conceptual issues in the work including design and functionality. The culmination will be a feast at the end of the term where each student brings food appropriate for the pots that they designed. Prerequisites: One prior class in ceramics or permission of the instructor.

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2013 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4208.01

Storing and Serving

In this class well investigate two types of vessels, the jar and platter. These vessels have been used to celebrate the serving and storage of foodstuffs along with the ritualized events of burial, throughout history. Whether used in tombs, palaces, or the modern home, jars and platter express the ideas of our culture. Students will be participating in visual research and create a body of work using both types of forms in this course. Prerequisites: Two ceramic courses and permission of the instructor.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4207.01

The Grand Vessel

In this class we will investigate the history of vessels made to impress, to awe, and to celebrate the technical as well as the symbolic meaning of culture in different countries. Large and small in scale, these vessels have been made for millenniums to be used in tombs, in palaces, and in industrial expositions as well as in private homes. These vessels often go to unimagined technical levels, impressing even the most jaded viewer. Students will complete written and visual research into these works culminating in a presentation. Along with this research each student will create a body of work in ceramics representing their own version of the Grand Vessel. Some books will be required to be purchased as text for this course. Prerequisites: Two ceramic classes or permission of faculty

  • Barry Bartlett | SP2013 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4319.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2010 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER4319.01

The Hollow Form

This objective of this class is to help students learn the breadth of handbuilding techniques in the ceramic arts that have given rise to a vast history of ideas observed using hollow forms. Unlike traditional sculptural techniques used in wood, stone and metal, ceramic forms have depended on the interior space, the void, to define both symbolic meaning and formal structure. This class will help students gain confidence in their capacity to build what they see in their mind's eye. Projects will be conceptually geared around issues surrounding vessels, figures and abstract sculpture and will require personal investigation and resolution. Students will be involved in the development of presentations covering these issues from various historical perspectives. Students will be expected to participate in all aspects of the ceramic process that include, but are not limited to mixing their own clay, slip and glaze preparation, and the loading and firing of kilns. Some books will be required to be purchased as text for this course. Prerequisites: None

  • Barry Bartlett | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER2221.01

The Language of Material and Process

This course will investigate the unique material nature of clay by integrating digital tools and concepts. A paradigm shift occurs when a robot replaces the hand and a 3D digital model replaces the sketch. A Cartesian robot moves in three-dimensional space, but giving this movement purpose is still the job of an artist. We will look at applying computer-controlled robots towards the formation of ceramic objects. Investigation will cover 3D printing with wet slip extrusion, 3D printed objects to cast ceramic through traditional plaster molds, CNC carved plaster molds and laser etching into glaze surfaces. Rhino 3D modeling will complement each process. Prerequisites: Intro to Rhino or two ceramic courses, and permission of the instructors.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2013 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4250.01
  • Barry Bartlett | SP2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4250.01
  • Barry Bartlett | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER4250.01
  • Guy Snover | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER4250.01

The Molten Surface

This intensive seven-week course will take an experiential approach to glaze chemistry and application. Focusing less on functional glazes and more on how individual chemicals affect the behavior of glazes, coursework will include lectures and experimentation ranging the gambit of temperatures and atmospheres possible in ceramics. Among the many things covered, students will explore the potential of multiple firings, low-fire reduction, underglaze, and overglaze. Emphasis will be placed on developing a variety of unique and innovative glassy surfaces for all types of ceramic objects. Prerequisites: None.

  • Chad Gunderson | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | CER2135.01

Throwing: The Composition of Parts

This course is designed for the committed throwing student who is interested in exploring more complex pottery forms. Using the potters wheel students will explore the challenge of compound forms such as cups with handles, covered jars and teapots. Students will be asked to expand their form vocabulary and further integrate form and fired surface. Student teams will fire class work with faculty supervision. Slide lectures, library visits and critiques will provide historic references and peer perspective on the projects. Prerequisites: One college level throwing class.

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2011 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4222.01

Varied Vessels

This class will focus on challenging our preconceptions of pots and vessels. Readings, discussions, and research will support students' individual search for personal expression through the making of vessel forms. Considerations will be: What space does a vessel occupy and contain? How do you enter that space (formally and conceptually)? What is the pot's relationship to utility? Discussions will address formal and conceptual issues in the work including scale, audience, and use. Students will be encouraged to identify and to pursue personal directions within their work. Demonstrations, slide lectures, library visits, and critiques will provide reference and perspective on the projects. Students will be expected to engage more fully in the whole ceramic process. Assignments can be completed utilizing whatever means of making students choose. Students will choose materials and firing type appropriate to their work and test glazes accordingly. Work made in this class will be fired by groups of students under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: One college level ceramics class.

  • Aysha Peltz | SP2012 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4226.01

Wood Kilns, A History in Practice

This course will be focused on new techniques that investigate clay and glazes in the wood-fired kiln. As a class we will improve our understanding of technologies used by both ancient cultures and contemporary artist. Through this study of the earliest types of firing techniques and moving forward in time to the current use of these kilns as a contemporary language in the ceramic arts, the student will gain broader technical control of their own work and learn how current artists mine history to connect and expand their vocabulary as artists. Students will be expected to be making studio ceramic work throughout the term and to fire the work in the wood kiln. A body of wood-fired works at the end of the term will form their final project presentation. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2012 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4205.01
  • Barry Bartlett | SP2012 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | CER4205.01

Wood Kilns, A History in Practice Lab


  • Barry Bartlett | SP2012 | , - | CER4205L.01

Digital Art

Adobe Creative Suite for Artists

This course familiarizes students with Adobe's Creative Suite and how to incorporate these powerful tools into their creative work. We will explore best practices for using the software for idea development, sketching, prototyping, and presentation. The majority of the course focuses on Adobe Illustrator as well as related lessons in Adobe Photoshop and InDesign. Major tools of the programs are covered including image editing and manipulation, creating original vector graphics, working with type, and creating templates for books and portfolios. Students will apply skills learned to their own creative projects and ideas. Prerequisites: None.

  • Timothy Clark | SP2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA2102.01
  • Timothy Clark | SP2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA2102.01
  • Timothy Clark | FA2012 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2102.01

Data: Art Transformations

We are living in the midst of a data explosion: a sudden accumulation of huge volumes of data - much of it readily accessible online - describing our everyday world from global economic fluctuations to social networking trends and traffic patterns. But how does this raw data become narrative? What alchemy transforms data from information into meaning? And when data is collected and selected, what's been omitted or erased? Data visualization typically is illustrative and utilitarian, but data can be unraveled and re-expressed, transformed into artworks. We will examine information design strategies and the visual language of the infographic as a starting point in creating our own data-based art works. We will experiment with approaches to data that are playful, reverent, poetic, subversive, and ultimately narrative. We will consider works by Alex Dragalescu, Christian Nold, Edward Tufte, Eric Rodebeck, and Chris Jordan. Students will learn basic programming skills in the open source language Processing, and work with data sets and APIs to generate dynamic programs, screen-based artworks, and digital prints. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Zannah Marsh | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA4105.01

Design for Artists

This course provides an introduction to basic principles of design and offers an overview of digital design tools for artists. Drawing exercises from the Bauhaus Basic Course, Design for Artists incorporates historical and theoretical context while enhancing visual literacy and building technical skills. Students will learn the basics of the Adobe Creative Suite, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign, and will complete independent design projects relevant to their own artistic work. Prerequisites: DA2101 Introduction to Digital Art or permission of the instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4110.01

Digital Synaesthesia

In this course we'll rebuild and rewire the connections among artistic disciplines, examining the mutable nature of sensory information with innovative technologies including motion sensing, live video manipulation, Arduino microcontrollers, and smart phones. We'll learn Max/MSP/Jitter as a core language with which to make dance sing, visualize music, and turn video into kinetic sculpture. Emphasis is on students' own projects in music, video, dance, interactive installation art, and multimedia performance. Students must work in a collaborative, workshop environment, creating devices and coding for one another. Prerequities: Permission of instructor. Contact Kate Dollenmayer or Nick Brooke for futher information.

  • Adam Rokhsar | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4106.01

Ideas and Art

This is a course about the development of creative ideas. Once you have the beginnings of an idea, how do you fine-tune, revise, and develop it into a strong creative work? How do you choose the best medium to realize your ideas? We will look at art historical examples and examine the creative process from many different individual perspectives and media. This course is well suited to seniors or students enrolled in any projects level course within the Visual Arts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Robert Ransick | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4104.01

Introduction to Digital Arts

This course provides an introduction to the use of digital technologies in an art context. Through creative projects, readings, lectures, and critique students will gain knowledge of the history, theory and practice of web-based creative practices and develop skills to expand their personal work. Thematic concerns within digital art will be explored, and students will gain skills in Photoshop, Dreamweaver, HTML and CSS. Written assignments and oral presentations will encourage independent research and critical thinking and enhance communication skills. Prerequisites: None.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA2101.01

Me/You/Us: Digital Narratives

Hyper-accessible, asynchronous, anonymous, social, and confessional: the nature of web-and the emergence of new media forms and applications for it-has created a unique and evolving environment for storytelling. We will survey a range of new narrative forms, such as digital comics, collective storytelling sites, blogs and vlogs, "Lifecasting," fan fiction, twitter and cellphone "novels," and transmedia storytelling. We will examine how authenticity, documentary, authorship, voyeurism, sousveillance, and exhibitionism come into play in these new forms. We will experiment with strategies for constructing non-linear narratives, collecting user-generated content, and creating participatory storytelling projects. We will consider works such as Post Secret, Miranda July and Herrell Fletcher's Learning to Love You More site, Jonathan Harris' We Feel Fine and The Whale Hunt. We will read texts by Henry Jenkins, Marshall MacLuhan, Clay Shirky, and Scott McCloud. Students will learn basic web design (HTML and CSS) and programming skills and image processing software (Adobe Photoshop) to create visual, interactive, narrative art projects for the web. Prerequisites: None.

  • Zannah Marsh | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA2105.01

Object Oriented: Creating & Making with Technology

This class examines sophisticated technologies including 3D printing, laser cutting, and CNC milling as tools for realizing creative ideas. We engage this new landscape of object making in relation to the fine arts and design. We will examine and respond to varying methodologies that have provoked a recalibration of conceptual, aesthetic, and design values. Readings investigate current scholarship with respect to an ecology of things, emphasizing broader social, cultural and environmental concerns. We will develop and initiate strategies to move from idea to prototype, to final project. Students are encouraged to have some experience with a 3D program, Adobe Illustrator and/or physical computing. Technologist: Guy Snover Prerequisites: Permission of the instructors.

  • Jon Isherwood | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DA4208.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DA4208.01

Rhino 3D Modeling Tool Box

This is a seven-week introductory course in 3D modeling open to all students. Three-dimensional modeling is a critical skill for the realization of spatial form in the 21st century. We will be using Rhinoceros, a 3D modeling environment widely used in a number of industries--including architecture, engineering, art production, fabrication, manufacturing, product design, Film/television, and sciences. As an accurate and flexible software tool, Rhino allows users to pursue anything from orthogonal solid modeling to free-form NURBS surface modeling. We will survey a range of modeling techniques needed to work in 3D. In addition to modeling, we will cover processes for representing models as rendered images, drawings, and output through CNC fabrication technologies. Prerequisites: None.

  • Guy Snover | SP2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA2106.01

Social Practices in Art

Social practices in art incorporates many diverse strategies from interactive media, online networks, manifestos, street interventions, social sculpture, design, performance, activism, open systems, public discourse and more. In this course we examine the history of social practice and focus in on how media and technology are impacting and shifting current practice. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively on projects that critically engage topics pertinent to this moment in history and are situated in the public sphere -- local or global, online or offline. There are lectures, reading assignments, studio projects and critiques during the course. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Robert Ransick | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | APA4104.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4104.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4104.01

The Fine Art of Physical Computing

This course aims to extend our notions of the creative fine art potential of computers by exploring uses beyond standard mouse/keyboard/screen interaction. Moving away from these restrictions the course introduces students to basic electronics and programming an Arduino (microcontroller) to read sensors placed in physical objects or the environment. Projects are designed to provide students with basic skills that can be applied to creative projects. Idea development is a critical component of this course, along with readings, discussions, and the creation of individual and collaborative projects. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Robert Ransick | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4261.01
  • Robert Ransick | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4261.01
  • Robert Ransick | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DA4261.01

The Web as Artistic Platform

This course is an introduction to creative practices within digital technologies specifically focused on Internet based fine art projects. A broad survey of web-based digital arts is examined in tandem with an overview of tools necessary to create your own work. These include HTML, CSS, Photoshop, content management systems, and a basic introduction to JavaScript. Students apply knowledge and skills to web-based creative projects throughout the term. There are lectures, reading assignments, studio projects, and critiques during the course designed to aid the student in developing visual literacy and critical thinking skills in relation to the digital arts. Prerequisites: None.

  • Robert Ransick | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2110.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2110.01
  • Robert Ransick | SP2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2110.01
  • Robert Ransick | SP2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2110.01
  • Robert Ransick | SP2014 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DA2110.01

Drawing

13 Zines: Research/Drawing/Design

(after Thirteen Ways of Looking At A Blackbird) This is a course for students who love to look into things. In it we examine the acquisition, presentation, and relationships of specific bodies of knowledge. Each week students choose subjects that fall under broad headings provided as common starting points. Through library research and empirical evidence, information is acquired, drawn, and organized, resulting in the production of one or more zines per week. Processes and conditions are presented weekly, forming parameters for working. Readings from a wide range of subjects, including zine history are required, as is a significant amount of out of class work. Class time is spent drawing, reading, and discussing each others work. Prerequisites: Three courses in visual art, including one in Drawing and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | FA2012 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW4270.01

Drawing Everywhere

Interior and exterior, observed and imagined, expansive and intimate, this course revolves around drawings of all kinds of spaces. In class we examine various historical, narrative, architectural, and natural spaces through work that pushes the definition of drawing in many different directions, including drawing installation. Students complete work weekly, building a body of drawings that begins with assigned problems and allows for a breadth of interpretation and media. Research about the representation of space/place in history and in contemporary visual culture is undertaken and presented by all. The goal of this course is for students to discover and pursue individual, idiosyncratic languages for representing the world in which we live, by making drawings of, about, and in space. This is an intermediate/advanced level drawing course, and a high degree of motivation and production is expected. Prerequisites: At least two previous visual arts courses at Bennington including one in Drawing and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | FA2013 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW4239.01

Drawing in Color

From Kandinsky's teaching of color and analytical drawing at the Bauhaus to the rich collages of Kurt Schwitters, to the invented worlds of many contemporary artists, ideas about color continually push drawing to its limits. This course provides an opportunity for students to develop a set of interests and impulses connected to translating and intermingling the languages of color and drawing. Using a variety of media, including watercolor, gouache, colored pencils, and colored papers, students work from both close observation and intuition/imagination. The goal is to understand the drawn world in color, a world that may be different for each individual student. Basic drawing skills are expected and are emphasized. Students complete assigned in and out of class work on a weekly basis. Readings, discussions, and critiques complement in class drawing sessions. A high level of self- motivation is expected. Prerequisites: One previous drawing or painting class at Bennington and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW4281.01

Drawing is a Verb

"Take an object. Do something to it. Do something else to it. Do something else to it." -Jasper Johns Shying away from the static, resolved, or finished image, this course will explore drawing as a process of ongoing inquiry. It is intended to foster an experimental and experiential approach to artmaking, generally eschewing representation. Students will engage with various techniques and processes to make drawings that document experience as well as create an image. Topics to be considered include: artistic intent, ambition and failure, ambiguity, and technique as taste. Class time is used for drawing, technical demonstrations, discussion and critique. Prerequisites: a positive attitude and an open mind.

  • Joshua Blackwell | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2104.01

Fashion and Modernism

"Let there be fashion, down with art" -Max Ernst The rise of capitalism and the Industrial Revolution led to radical shifts in politics and art in the late 19th century. Fashion acts as a powerful analogue to and forecaster of Modernism. Artists such as Henri Matisse, Leon Bakst, Sonia Delaunay and Salvador Dali took note of fashion's nascent agency and created clothing as a means of engaging the new political, social and cultural landscapes of the 20th Century. Influenced by Charles Baudelaire's radical questioning of beauty and fashion, artists attempted to define fashion's role in culture, manipulating it to reflect their own proclivities. This course will introduce and reconsider various movements such as Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Constructivism, Dada, and Surrealism through the lens of fashion, investigating the various agendas and ideologies deployed. Students will create artworks that engage the political spectrum as it intersects with Modernism's aesthetic partisanship, including the creation of original garments. While this is a studio course, there will be weekly reading assignments and discussion as well as critiques. Students may work in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, video, or costume design. A high degree of motivation is expected. Prerequisites: at least two courses in Visual Arts and permission of the instructor.

  • Joshua Blackwell | SP2012 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW4109.01

Juxtaposition: Drawing and Collage

Since the beginning of the 20th century, collage has existed as a vehicle for the most diverse ideas and political concerns of the times. Collage is not simply a method of assembly, a way to bring unrelated fragments into new contexts, but a way of thinking that reflects revolution of all kinds. From Picasso and Braque to Hoch and Heartfield, and more recently Martha Rosler and Mark Bradford, collage confronts the forest of signs, and seeks to cause change through visual means. This drawing course makes use of the traditional media and skills of drawing in combination with found materials and texts. Emphasis is placed on the translation of ideas into a vast quantity of "assembled" drawings. Prerequisites: One previous drawing class at Bennington and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | FA2010 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW4106.01

Life Stories: The Figure in Context

Drawings of the human figure have the power to reveal as much about the artist as about the subject at hand. What or who is drawn works in concert with the skill and decision-making process of the drawer to expose a fascinating third thing, the "real" subject. This advanced drawing course will satisfy the student who is curious about drawing the presence and absence of the human figure, in context. Each class period will be spent working to create images from observed life (including models, objects, and settings) that speak to a particular aspect of the human condition. In-class drawings will be supplemented by discussions, critiques, readings, and out-of-class assigned work. An independent project will be part of the course structure, and a high degree of self-motivation is expected. Prerequisites: Two visual arts courses including one in drawing or painting.

  • Mary Lum | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW4259.01

Markmaking and Representation

The fundamentals of drawing are the basic tools for this investigation into seeing and translation. Using simple methods and means, the practice of drawing is approached from both traditional and experimental directions. The focus of this inquiry is on drawing from observation, broadly defined. In class drawing sessions are complemented by independent, outside of class work and occasional assigned readings. The goals of the course include the development of individual confidence in observational drawing skills, a working knowledge of the rich histories and contemporary concerns of drawing, and a practical basis for further inquiry into all the visual arts. Previous drawing experience may be helpful, but is not required of students enrolling in this course. Prerequisites: None.

  • Mary Lum | FA2010 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | SP2013 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | SP2014 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Mary Lum | SP2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2149.01
  • Colin Brant | FA2012 | W, 8:00AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.02
  • Colin Brant | FA2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.02
  • Mary Lum | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.02
  • Mary Lum | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2149.02
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2010 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRW2149.03

Order: Finding Structure for Drawing

It could be said that a drawing is a type of container for the organization of ideas, responses or visual situations. The artists approach to this organization or ordering is in direct relation to the meaning or implication of an image. The question of how one finds order (or disorder) is at the core of what it means to create art, to find form for expression. We will spend the term looking carefully at the systems, structures, arrangements - the form that drawing takes both as activity and object. We will observe organizational structure in natural objects, in architecture, in painting, and drawing. We will also look to examples from poetry and mathematics in order to observe structure and the creation of meaning. Students will complete visual work weekly, both in and outside of class. There will also be reading assignments, class critique and discussion, presentations and required visiting artist lectures. Although assignments will be given, it is the objective of this class to provide the skills necessary for the student to confidently pursue self-designed projects. A high degree of motivation is expected.

  • Ann Pibal | SP2013 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW2106.01

The Language of Drawing: Investigating Abstraction

Drawing is inherently a process of abstracting the world. How do we make use of myriad forms, concepts, and materials to make meaningful images? How does a practitioner "use" drawing to express ideas? What does it mean to work "through" an idea? In this course we look carefully at systems and structures, as well as modes of thinking in the real world. We closely examine drawings and drawing processes from the Modern and Contemporary periods, in order to glean knowledge of these histories and awareness of the abstract nature of all drawing. We make a lot of drawings of all kinds. The emphasis of the course is the improvement of individual drawing voices and skills through an increased understanding of the abstract language of drawing.Students complete work weekly. Class time is used for drawing, discussion, critique, presentations and demonstrations of materials. Although assignments are given, it is the objective of this class to provide the skills necessary for students to confidently pursue self-designed projects. A high degree of motivation is expected. Prerequisites: One previous class in drawing or painting at Bennington and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | SP2013 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW4246.01

Visible Language: Word And/As Image

The observed world is covered with words, both visible and invisible. This advanced drawing course aims to underline the tensions and comforts of the relationship between words and images in visual art. Through assigned drawing projects that call upon students to complete and present visual work regularly, topics such as narrative, sign and structure, juxtaposition, concrete poetry, found language, illustration, and sequential imagery are addressed. An historical context of visible language will be presented. Students are expected to be able to think abstractly, and to consider reading and drawing important parts of their daily life. Class structure includes in class work, out of class assignments, an independent project, readings, discussions and critiques. A high level of self-motivation is expected. Prerequisites: Two previous visual arts courses, one in drawing, and permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | FA2011 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRW4401.01

Film and Video

Advanced Projects in Video

This is a workshop for advanced students pursuing self-directed projects in video. Class time will be spent on group critiques to be supplemented by screenings, readings, discussion, student presentations and individual meetings with the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2013 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | FV4304.01
  • Kate Purdie | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4304.01
  • Kate Dollenmayer | FA2012 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4305.01

Advanced Video

This is an advanced course for self-directed students working on complex video art projects. Workshops, readings, and screenings will complement critiques. Students will determine goals and will be judged based on their completion. Prerequisites: Two video courses or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

  • Kate Purdie | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4301.01

An Introduction to the Art of Sound Design

How can music, voices, natural and human sounds be used to create a sonic world for live performance, recordings and visual media? This class explores how sound designers work with and manipulate these elements to create sound art. Classes include the exploration of the various uses of Pro Tools as a computer audio production tool for media and live performance, discussions on readings by and about important musical/sound artists, and weekly viewings of films that illustrate the concepts under discussion. Students are encouraged to enter into collaborations with directors, choreographers and film makers in the creation of their final projects. Prerequisites: None.

  • Julie Last | FA2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MSR2100.01
  • Julie Last | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MSR2100.01
  • Scott Lehrer | FA2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MSR2100.01

Camera Exposure: Video and Animation

This course will offer beginning, intermediate, and advanced video and animation students the opportunity to gain technical proficiency in image exposure and lens selection for moving-image production including (but not limited to) 2D cut-out and drawn animation, 3D puppet animation, and location shooting for documentary, narrative and experimental video. Prerequisites: None.

  • Warren Cockerham | SP2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2110.01

Collage/ Montage/ Essay: Found Material

This intermediate studio/ seminar course centers on the history, theory, and technique of using found footage material in essayistic moving image work. Students will complete a series of essayitic film and video projects exploring approaches and techniques including but not limited to non-narrative, political, personal, abstract, structural, and materialist forms. The course will contextualize contemporary practice within the history of avant-garde, underground, and "non-fiction" film through screenings, theoretical and historical readings, and discussions. Corequisites: Must also participate in screenings in Kinoteca, Thursdays 7-10pm. Prerequisites: Intro to Video or Intro to Puppets and Animation (or equivalents), one other course in the Visual Arts (preferably outside of Film/Video/Animation), and the permission of the instructor.

  • Warren Cockerham | SP2014 | F, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4141.01

Collage/Montage

This 7-week intensive course will introduce visual arts students to the history, theory, and technique of using found footage material in film, video, and animation. Students will learn to assemble found materials from the print, film, analog and digital tape, DVD, the web, and blu-ray alongside or composited with originally photographed material. Readings and screenings will accompany technical instruction and tutorials. Students will explore several software programs including but not limited to Final Cut Pro, Photoshop, After Effects, and several extraction and compression programs. Each student will produce a handful of short videos throughout the course of the term. Prerequisites: None.

  • Warren Cockerham | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2141.01

Documentary Production: Personal and Political

This course explores documentary possibilities through screenings and video projects. Screenings and readings will focus on films that have had a social or political impact using styles from portraiture to polemicism. With group projects and individual work, we will take a hands-on approach to documentary production: interview techniques and verit shooting to story development and collage editing. Prerequisites: FV 2101 Introduction to Video or equivalent.

  • Kate Purdie | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4313.01

Documentary Video Production: The Environment

This course explores documentary possibilities through screenings and video projects. The organizing theme for the class will be the environment local farms and food distribution, pollution, individual activism, grassroots organizing, etc. In the screening room, we will explore documentary styles from portraiture to polemicism. In the field, through both collaborative and individual projects, students will grapple with the practical challenges of documentary production: story structure, interview techniques, verite camerawork and collage editing. Students will have an opportunity to become familiar with "Localvore" issues through group projects related to our collaboration with Valerie Imbruce's class on Bennington's Farm to Plate Program. Prerequisites: Intro to Video, or equivalent.

  • Kate Purdie | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4115.01

Experimental Filmmaking

This intermediate studio course centers on experimentation with form in moving image making. Students will complete a series of film and video projects exploring approaches and techniques including but not limited to non-narrative, lyrical, abstract, structural, and materialist forms. The course will contextualize contemporary practice within the history of avant-garde and underground film through screenings, theoretical and historical readings, and discussion. Prerequisites: Intro to Video (or equivalent) and one other course in Visual Arts and permission of instructor.

  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2013 | F, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4307.01
  • Warren Cockerham | FA2013 | F, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4307.01

Global Activist Video Production

This course will involve real-time, interactive dialogue between artists and social activists in the classroom and across the globe. Students will interact with international filmmakers and advocates in both real and virtual spaces. They will also explore the boundaries of group and individual documentary production through the examination of story structure, interview techniques, collage editing, video installation displays and other areas of creative opportunity. Prerequisites: Intro to Video or permission of instructor

  • Erika Mijlin | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV4226.01
  • Kate Purdie | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV4226.01

Intermediate Video: The Five Productions

This course involves group productions of five different projects. Students will take different roles in each production from director to cameraperson to editor. Each production will have formalistic requirements to follow, starting with a silent abstract film and moving on to narrative and documentary forms. Screenings and readings will give context to the projects. Prerequisites: FV2101 Introduction to Video, FV2103 Video Toolbox, or equivalent.

  • Kate Purdie | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4101.01
  • Kate Purdie | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4101.01

Introduction to Video

This course teaches techniques fundamental to the craft of moving image creation, including cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and editing. It also provides a conceptual framework for video as an art medium. Students will build individual technical skills while developing an aesthetic vocabulary based on medium-specific audiovisual qualities. Throughout the term we will screen a broad range of examples of film and video works of genres both familiar and perhaps alien. We will address ideas and techniques spanning storytelling and nonnarrative approaches, fiction and nonfiction, linear and nonlinear structures (such as web-based projects), abstraction and representation. We'll spend equal time on the technical skills and the creative possibilities of sound and image editing. Prerequisites: None

  • Kate Dollenmayer | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | ENV2174.01
  • Kate Dollenmayer | FA2011 | F, 8:00AM-12:00PM | FV2101.01
  • Kate Purdie | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2101.01
  • Warren Cockerham | FA2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2101.01
  • Kate Purdie | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV2101.01
  • Kate Purdie | FA2010 | WF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | FV2101.01
  • Kate Purdie | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2101.02
  • Kate Purdie | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2101.02

Movies on Film

This course follows in a venerable tradition of people who make movies in the film medium using minimal resources and maximal arts-and-crafts ingenuity. We will explore a variety of techniques, most without the use of a camera, for making motion pictures directly on 16mm film. We will discuss this movement within the context of cinema's history as a whole, and screen examples ranging from some of the earliest hand-tinted motion pictures to films from the vibrant contemporary community of film(hand-)makers. Each student will create a short (1-3 minute) film to be screened at the end of the course. Prerequisites: None.

  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2150.01
  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2150.01

Moving Image History of the 1970s

The 70s were an extraordinary time for every aspect of moving imagery, from the gritty films set in a New York City on the brink of bankruptcy to Coppola's masterpieces of Godfathers 1 & 2 to the emergence of television as an art form. Ironically, the same decade that saw the first blockbuster (Jaws) also gave birth to the first authentic independent American cinema, from directors like Scorsese, Bogdanovitch, Polanski, and Altman. In Europe, internationally acclaimed directors like Fellini and Bergman were making their mature works. Artists like Joan Jonas and Beryl Korot innovated in the new technology of video as technology exploded. This course will explore every aspect of moving image history in the 70s, with weekly in-class screenings, readings and discussion. Prerequisites: None.

  • Julie Talen | SP2011 | F, 1:10PM- 5:00PM | FV2149.01

Multichannel Narrative: Intermediate Video

This class will cover the basic elements that make the divided screen a new vocabulary for visual storytelling. We will explore such elements as the still vs. the moving camera; the long, uncut take; visual fugues and cutting for visual rhythm. Examples of this form will be studied in both single channel and split-screen films as well as non-narrative "experimental" films, film and video installations, and the inherent multiplicity in online forms. Class assignments will include readings, exercises and a short video with a story or concept that employs a divided frame for which we'll learn how to write, storyboard, make shot lists, shoot with multiple cameras, and edit a multichannel video. Prerequisites: FV2101 Introduction to Video. Corequisites: Screening, Th 7 - 9pm.

  • Julie Talen | FA2010 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV4225.01

Narrative Cinema: Century One

A broad view of narrative cinema history : from the very origins of film genres, through the definitions of style in the 'classical' film era, to the institution of 'master' narratives provided by the studio system. The course will take on both the legacy of a century of formal innovations as well as outright challenges to the medium, including: New Wave cinema, the Dogma filmmakers, the various waves of the American 'indie' film movements, and contemporary forms that push the edges of the genre. Our goal is to break away from a strict chronology, to find the larger formal and thematic patterns of narrative film history from inside and outside the margins, and perhaps to imagine the future of the medium itself. Prerequites: None.

  • Erika Mijlin | SP2013 | MTh, 7:00PM- 9:00PM | FV2113.01
  • Erika Mijlin | SP2014 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | FV2113.01

Post Production for Video

This course will offer beginning, intermediate, and advanced video students the opportunity to gain technical proficiency in video capturing, editing, compression, DVD authoring, sound mixing, color-correction, and HD workflow. Although this course will place a heavy emphasis on technical instruction, students will also participate in conceptual and theoretical discussions concerning current and historical approaches to film/video editing and distribution. Prerequisites: None.

  • Warren Cockerham | SP2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2301.01

Special Projects in Video

This group tutorial is designed for experienced students capable of independent work on video projects. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and submission of a proposal for a project.

  • Kate Purdie | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4796.01
  • Kate Purdie | SP2011 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | FV4796.01

Tech Lab for Advanced Projects in Video

This two-credit lab will be a technological supplement and a corequisite to FV4305 Advanced Projects in Video. Self-directed students will focus on gaining advanced technological knowledge for the purpose of completing their own self-designed video project(s). Prerequisites: Two prior courses in video and permission of the instructor. Corequisites: FV4305 Advanced Projects in Video.

  • Warren Cockerham | FA2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV4306.01

Technology is Form: Advanced Video

The screen, once trapped in mere moviehouses and living room TVs, has exploded into a thousand new places, from buildings that blink in Times Square to videos that drench the walls of the Museum of Modern Art, from Broadway stages to our own computers. Implicit in this new technology of glimpsed meaning is a form that this class will explore: how the relatedness of separate screens can bring meaning, coherence and potential narrative to the technologies that create these divisions. The multi-screen work of Pipilotti Rist, William Kentridge, Doug Aitkin, Gary Hill and Bruce Naumann, among others, will be discussed. Work will include readings, individual projects and both written and video assignments. Thursday evening required screenings. Prerequisites: Two prior video courses. Corequisites: Screening, Th 7 - 9pm.

  • Julie Talen | FA2010 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV4302.01

The Moving Image Record

How are motion pictures preserved and passed down? In a medium that has evolved so quickly and expansively over such a short time, how can we be confident that what has been preserved is more exemplary or significant than what has been lost or forgotten? The aim of this course is multifaceted: to explore what it means to archive moving images, and to seek out moving image works that lie outside the mainstream of recognized historical value, as well as works that have eluded preservation or ones that present peculiar archival challenges. Through this lens we'll chart the history of human interest in moving images, and the many levels on which those moving images themselves function as records. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Screening Wednesday at 7pm.

  • Kate Dollenmayer | FA2012 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | FV2152.01
  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2012 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | FV2152.01

Video Installation

This studio course will survey moving image work that is created for experiences outside of a typical cinematic setting. Students will explore the expanded possibilities of video in gallery and site-specific installations. Although this course will be mostly based on the technical practice of video installation, students will also be required to complete readings and participate in discussions on the historical and theoretical practice of expanded cinema. In addition to one in-class field trip, students will also be required to visit and write about one video installation outside of class time. Prerequisites: None.

  • Warren Cockerham | FA2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2127.01

Video Toolbox

A hands-on introduction to the technology and techniques of video making. Using digital video cameras, we will learn principles of motion picture photography, lighting, sound recording, editing and post-production. Classes will include brief lectures and screenings, but will consist mostly of group exercises and demonstration. Readings and short individual assignments outside of class will culminate in a group video project to be shot, edited, and screened at the conclusion of the 7 weeks. Prerequisites: None.

  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2103.01
  • Kate Dollenmayer | SP2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2103.01

Video/Performance

This course will investigate intersections of performance and video. Topics and projects will include performance for the camera, performance with the camera, and documenting live performance (multi-camera set-ups and editing). Beginning, intermediate, and advanced video students are welcome. Prerequisites: None.

  • Warren Cockerham | FA2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2140.01
  • Warren Cockerham | FA2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | FV2140.01

Video: Experiments in Documentary

This course explores the full range of non-fiction possibilities including ethnographic films, personal cinema, cinema verite and even mockumentaries through screenings and video projects. Beginning with a group project and advancing to individual work, we will take a hands-on approach to documentary production: from interview techniques and verite shooting to character development and collage editing. Prerequisites: Introduction to Video or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

  • Kate Purdie | SP2011 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV4312.01

Women and Film

A survey of women's roles in the history of the moving image worldwide-as subject, object, maker, viewer, consumer, and critic. What influence has feminism had on how we make and watch moving images today? We'll study typically female roles within the film industry and notable women who occupied them, as well women who broke barriers to penetrate traditionally male realms. In addition to lecture and discussion of readings from Mulvey, hooks, Johnston, Silverman, and the journal Women & Film, we will screen and study the work of women film- and videomakers such as Dorothy Arzner, Julie Dash, Trinh T. Min-ha, Kelly Reichardt, Su Friedrich, Miranda July, Chick Strand, Lotte Reiniger, Susan Mogul, and Chantal Akerman. Students will write several short response papers and a longer film-analytical essay using secondary texts. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Screening, W 7pm

  • Kate Dollenmayer | FA2011 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | FV2105.01

Media Arts

Advanced Digital Animation

This course introduces students to the basic language of 3D animation. Students will be expected to become familiar with the basic principles of the Maya program and to produce a short animation by the end of the term. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | SP2011 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4205.01
  • Sue Rees | SP2012 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4205.01

Advanced Digital Modeling

This course introduces students to the basic language of 3D animation and modeling. Students will be expected to become familiar with the basic principles of the Maya program and to produce a short animation by the end of the term, or a series of modeled objects and spaces. Additionally, during the course we will print forms, utilizing 3D printers. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4204.01

Advanced Projects in Theater Design and Animation

The course will be for sustained work on animation or set design. Students will be expected to create a complete animation , completed project or set design. The expectation is that students will become dexterous in a number of programs, creating sets and characters, and work with sound effects and sound scores. Work by animators will have a public showing. Prerequisites: Prior work in puppets and animation or set design and permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | SP2012 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRA4796.01
  • Sue Rees | SP2011 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4796.01

Animating the 2-Dimensional World

The class will be concerned with creating short animations utilizing two dimensional imagery. The animations will be created using After Effects, Photoshop, scanned and captured images and manipulated with After Effects and other software programmes. Original narratives or adapted stories will be used for the animations. Various animators will be looked at. Prerequisites: MA2325 Puppets and Animation 1 or permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | FA2011 | T, 8:00AM-12:00PM | DRA4120.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2010 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4101.01

Animation Projects

The course will be for sustained work on an animation. Students will be expected to create a complete animation, or project. The expectation is that students will be fully engaged in their project, and with critiques. Student will work with sound effects and sound scores to complete their final animation. A public showing will be required. Prerequisites: Two advanced level animation courses and permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | FA2011 | T, 6:30PM- 8:20PM | MA4201.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2013 | T, 6:30PM-10:10PM | MA4201.01
  • Sue Rees | SP2014 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4201.01

History of Animation

We will study past and present styles of animation, and examine animations from the 1800's through to the present. Early devices used to create moving images, through to contemporary artists and production companies such as The Brothers Quay, William Kentridge, Aardman Productions, and Pixar, will be investigated. The class will consist of film screenings, primarily focusing on the techniques used and how inventions influenced the creative process of the animators. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sue Rees | FA2011 | M, 6:30PM- 8:20PM | DRA2137.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2010 | M, 6:30PM- 8:20PM | MA2137.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2012 | M, 6:30PM- 8:20PM | MA2137.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2013 | M, 6:30PM- 8:20PM | MA2137.01

Introduction to Set Design

This class is concerned with taking a text, analyzing it and then producing designs for a performance space. The class is designed for students who are interested in set design and multi-media design, with an emphasis placed on combining forms. Various artists will be looked at as well as a variety of media investigated, basic VectorWorks drafting, and media projection. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sue Rees | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRA2215.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA2215.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA2215.01

Puppets and Animation I

The class will be concerned with animating inanimate objects by stop motion, drawings, and cut out collages. A variety of filmmakers and techniques will be looked at during the course of the semester. Students will be expected to produce a variety of short projects followed by a longer more sustained project based on current events and environmental issues. Students will be instructed in using 'Dragonframe' Software, the Multiplane process, and video editing software. Students are required to take MA2137 History of Animation in conjunction with this class. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: MA2137 History of Animation (M 6:30 - 8:20 pm). Lab, Tuesdays 1- 2 pm.

  • Sue Rees | FA2010 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | DRA2325.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2011 | M, 8:00AM-12:00PM | MA2325.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2012 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA2325.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2013 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA2325.01

Ways to Manipulate the Two-Dimensional World

The class will be concerned with creating short animations utilizing two dimensional imagery. The animations will be created using both software and a MultiPlane Camera;MultiPlane set ups have been used for animators from Lotte Reiniger to Norman McLaren, Disney to Martha Colburn. The software programs used will be primarily After Effects, DragonFrame and Photoshop. Additional experimentation will occur utilizing a laser cutter to create silhouettes. The subject matter for the first half of the semester will be based upon current affairs. The first half of the term will be concerned with experimenting in ways to manipulate two-dimensional imagery. The second half of the term will be working in more depth, utilizing the techniques learnt, to create a short animation. Prerequisites: MA2325 Puppets and Animation I or permission of the instructor.

  • Sue Rees | FA2013 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MA4102.01
  • Sue Rees | FA2012 | T, 8:00AM-12:00PM | MA4102.01

Painting

Advanced Workshop for Painting and Drawing

This course is for experienced student artists with a firm commitment to serious work in the studio. Students will work primarily on self-directed projects in an effort to refine individual concerns and subject matter. Students will present work regularly for critique in class as well as for individual studio meetings with the instructor. Development of a strong work ethic will be crucial. There will be an emphasis on the growth of each student's critical abilities, the skills to think clearly and speak articulately about one's own work and the work of others. There will be supplemental readings, student research, and presentations about the work of 20th and 21st century artists. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Ann Pibal | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4404.01

Critical Response in Painting

In order to make successful work, artists must know when to follow their instincts, take risks or try new approaches toward developing ideas. Self-confidence and the ability to be critical of one's own work are the tools that come with experience. This course is intended to offer students feedback on their work as it develops. Their work is addressed within the context of individual development and contemporary issues in painting. Critical response to student work is the primary emphasis of this class. Through visual dialogue, students become more adept at understanding their work objectively and gain confidence in their art-making. Students are expected to make visual and written presentations as well as participate in class discussions. All student work is to be completed outside of class time in assigned studios. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Andrew Spence | FA2010 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI4309.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4309.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4309.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4309.01

Form and Process: Investigations in Painting

This course introduces a variety of materials, techniques and approaches to painting. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding of color, form and space as well as individual research and conceptual concerns. The daily experience of seeing, along with the history of art, provides a base from which investigations are made. Formal, poetic, and social implications within paintings both from class and from art history are examined and discussed. Students complete work weekly. There are regular group critiques, and individual reviews, reading assignments and lectures by visiting artists. A high degree of motivation is expected. Prerequisites: None.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2012 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI2107.01
  • Ann Pibal | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI2107.01
  • Ann Pibal | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI2107.01
  • Ann Pibal | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI2107.01
  • Colin Brant | FA2011 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI2107.02
  • Ann Pibal | FA2010 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI2107.02

Introduction to Painting

This course is an introduction to technical and formal problems in painting, focusing on developing abilities in collusion with concepts and exploring different methods of achieving ""visual dexterity"". Designed to aid the student in developing skills and a visual language through the medium of painting, the emphasis is on the conceptual and ideological underpinnings of the work, and on the technique as it reinforces meaning. This is primarily a hands-on oil painting course. Painting is a complex artistic endeavor that encompasses aspects of nearly every kind of cultural production. In this class we will learn about the technical/material particularities of paint, and how to use this material for our own purposes. Further, we'll consider the strategies of painters past and present, to learn about their process as well as understand our own a little better. While the focus will be on hands-on experimentation, this will always be in the context of creating content; learning to connect formal choices (color, texture, scale, composition) with what we want a painting to ""say". Prerquisites: None.

  • Joshua Blackwell | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI2103.01

Making/ Meaning

"Art is not an object, but experience"- Josef Albers Behind the impulse to create is a search for meaning. When we make an artwork we are, therefore constructing its meaning. This course will focus on the intersection between the techniques and processes of making paintings and their underlying rationales. How does an artist's intimate knowledge of the craft of painting inform the way s/he looks at the world? Does subject matter precede meaning or follow it? What are our responsibilities as makers of art? Divided between making, reading, and critique, the class will investigate painting from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Extensive class discussions will focus on weekly assigned projects ranging from studio projects, critical responses to texts, and creative problem solving. Critiques will examine the ways and means of making, from inspiration to final product. Topics considered include: the value of skill, materials and their meaning, amateur versus professional, and the differences between art and design. Prerequisites: One class in painting and one other art related class.

  • Joshua Blackwell | SP2013 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4212.01

Painting in Context

This is a studio painting class. For many reasons, painting continues to be relevant over the long course of its history. In this class, students will explore various painting styles within the context of their personal experience. This course is designed for students who have some basic knowledge about painting, but is open to all beginners. Weekly projects, group critiques, and other art related discussions are the format of this course. Prerequisites: None.

  • Andrew Spence | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI2110.01
  • Andrew Spence | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI2110.01
  • Andrew Spence | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI2110.01

Painting Studio

This course will provide the student a broad platform from which to continue investigations in painting. Emphasis will be placed on cultivating individual research and conceptual concerns as well as the continued development of an understanding of color, form, and space. The daily experience of looking, along with the history of art will provide a base from which investigations will be made. Formal, poetic and social implications within artwork, both form class and from art history will be examined and discussed. Students will complete work weekly, there will be regular group critiques, individual reviews, reading assignments and lectures by visiting artists. A high degree of motivation is expected.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2013 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4204.01

Painting Studio: 20th/21st Century Themes

This intermediate course provides the student a broad platform from which to continue investigations in painting. Emphasis is placed on cultivating individual research and conceptual concerns in tandem with the continued development of an understanding of color, form and space. Structured investigation of painting and painting processes from the 20th Century provide a primary basis for supplemental student research and presentations. Focus is also placed on contemporary art and establishing an awareness of the aesthetic and philosophical context in which artists work today. Prerequisites: At least one term of painting at Bennington or permission of the instructor.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI4205.01

Subject and Meaning in Painting

Since the 1960s, art styles and trends have become increasingly diverse. This may make it easier for more artists to find acceptable venues of expression, but as the options increase, it may be more difficult for artists who are still in their formative stage of development to find their own way of expression. This course is designed for students who are starting to develop their own identity as painters. Experimenting with painting materials, techniques, and styles in painting will be encouraged. Both assigned projects and independent projects will be completed outside of class time in assigned studio areas. Group critiques, art-related discussions, slide presentations, and written assignments will be the format of this class. Individual critiques with the instructor will also occur. Prerequisites: One class in painting and one other art related class.

  • Andrew Spence | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI4202.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2010 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4202.01
  • Andrew Spence | SP2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4202.01
  • Andrew Spence | SP2014 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PAI4202.01

Thematic Workshop for Visual Arts: Utopia

"A Map of the World that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at" Lewis Mumford, The Story of Utopias Imagining the ideal has long been a driving force behind artistic endeavor from painting and sculpture to architecture and urban planning. We will explore the ways in which artists and creative thinkers have addressed concepts of the ideal through the formation and projection of grand designs - incorporating visions of both social/cultural and formal/aesthetic transformation. Our considerations will include: Idealized communities, humanist allegories, artists' cooperatives, educational proposals and the invention of alternative worlds. This course is intended for experienced student artists with a firm commitment to serious work in the studio. Although students will be asked to respond to questions presented in class, emphasis will be placed on self-directed projects, which support the development of an individual voice. A strong work ethic and the ability to think clearly and speak articulately about one's own work and the work of others will be emphasized. There will be regular group critiques, individual reviews, required readings and visiting artist lectures. Students may elect to generate work in any medium. Prerequisites: Two courses in visual art and permission of the instructors.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4175.01
  • Donald Sherefkin | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | ARC4175.01

Photography

Big: Exploring Large Scale Photography

This course offers students an opportunity to work with both digital and traditional means of attaining large scale photographs. Through readings and slide presentations we will explore the issues of scale in contemporary photography both here in the United States and abroad. Students are expected to do presentations, assignments and a final project. Each student will be offered the opportunity to generate 30x40" black and white murals, 24" wide digital prints from the Epson 7600, 20x24 fiber prints and 16x20 RC prints. The medium format and large format camera will be introduced, along with electronic flash and an introduction to scanning and image manipulation using Photoshop CS. Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4236.01
  • Jonathan Kline | FA2010 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4236.01
  • Jonathan Kline | SP2014 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4236.01

Color Photography

This course will present color photography in a different light. Discovering one's color aesthetic will be the basis of the class. Students will work with color negative, and slide film. Through assignments, presentations, and critiques students will learn to observe the color of light. Students will develop a better understanding of their own color vocabulary and how to achieve it through a variety of methods: film choices, filters, artificial lights, photoshop, time of day one photographs, to printing in the darkroom. Students will be expected to produce a portfolio of prints and to participate in critiques. Prerequisites: None.

  • Liz Deschenes | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2360.01

Critical Theory for Photographers

This course studies the writings of influential critics of contemporary culture and photography such as Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Susan Sontag, Abigail Solomon-Godeau and others. We will also be looking at a range of films that provide deeper insight into photographic practice. In addition to weekly written responses to assigned readings for class discussion, students can choose to create a portfolio of work for the mid-term and the final (ten prints each) or to write two seven-page papers on related topics that interest them. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Kline | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2501.01

Developing a Color Aesthetic

Making use of both film and digital technologies, this course explores the use of color in photography. Discovering one's color aesthetic will be the basis of the class. Through assignments, presentations, and critiques students will learn to observe the color of light. Students will develop a better understanding of their own color vocabulary and how to achieve it through a variety of methods: film choices, filters, artificial lights, Photoshop, and time of day one photographs, to darkroom and digital printing. Students will be expected to produce a portfolio of prints and to participate in critiques. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4245.01
  • Liz Deschenes | FA2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO4245.01

Digital Darkroom Essentials

Designed for students who have experience working with manual cameras, this seven-week course provides instruction in the processing of raw files with Lightroom and Photoshop, and the production of digital portfolios and high quality inkjet prints. Class time will include technical demonstrations and group critiques, as well as slide presentations and discussions. Selfdirected final projects will allow students to explore their own questions and concerns. Prerequisites: Photography Foundation OR Co-requisite: Foundations of Photography: Darkroom to Digital

  • Elizabeth White | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4235.01

Digital Photography Foundations

This course offers an introduction to the basics of digital photography and considers its relevance to contemporary culture. Students will use digital cameras, gain basic skills in non-destructive editing, color management, and inkjet printing. Readings will provide historical and theoretical context and encourage critical thinking about the impact of recent technical and social innovations related to photography. Class time will include technical demonstrations and group critiques, as well as slide presentations and discussions. Self-directed final projects will allow students to explore their own questions and concerns. Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation and permission of the instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2012 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO4101.01
  • Elizabeth White | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4101.01

Documentary Practice: Ethics of the Photographer

This course will investigate our understanding of the role photography has played in representing recent conflicts, disasters, and social upheaval from around the world. Readings include Martha Rosler, Susan Sontag, AD Coleman, David Levi-Strauss, and others. Films will also be scheduled to articulate particular points of view. Students are expected to complete either two photo projects or two seven-page papers in addition to weekly responses to the readings, films, and guests Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4109.01
  • Jonathan Kline | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4109.01

Films by Photographers

This course explores a wide range of film projects undertaken by still photographers over the course of the 20th century. We will be screening 14 films by such noted photographers as Paul Strand, Ruth Orkin, Robert Frank, William Klein, and Cindy Sherman. Students will be responsible for turning in a weekly response paper for each film. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2012 | Th, 10:10AM-12:00PM | PHO2151.01

Films for Photographers

This course explores the rich social history of photographers in film as captured by directors such as Louis Malle, Francois Truffaut, Michael Powell, Nicolas Roeg, and others. A wide range of early as well as contemporary international films will be screened weekly with a brief introductory lecture provided. Students are expected to write a weekly response to each film, in addition to a reflective essay at the midterm and final. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Kline | SP2013 | Th, 10:10AM-12:00PM | PHO2150.01

Foundations of Photography: Darkroom to Digital

The objective of this course is to provide the student with basic skills in shooting with both 35mm and DSLR cameras, and to offer experiences developing and printing black and white film in the darkroom. (Students interested in learning more about digital processing and production with Lightroom and Photoshop can co-register for the seven- week course Digital Darkroom Essentials, which will run in the second half of the term.) Class time will be spent working in the darkroom, on lab demonstrations, and in discussion of student work. In addition to technical lectures and reviews, a selection of images from the history of photography will be shown and discussed throughout the term. The slide presentations will introduce students to various photographic genres with an emphasis on contemporary practice. Short reading and writing assignments will be required. Prerequisites: None.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2014 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO2138.01

Historical Processes

This class investigates a variety of photographic processes that evolved in the second half of the nineteenth century and continue to be used by contemporary photographers today. We will explore the historical and chemical aspects of the following: light sensitive silver, iron, and palladium compounds; photogenic drawings; cyanotypes; collodion glass plate negatives; Van Dyke & Kallitypes; palladium prints. Each student has the opportunity to print his or her own images with a variety of these processes, and to become familiar with making enlarged negatives digitally and in the wet lab. The 4x5 view camera will also be introduced, along with slide presentations and assigned readings covering Pictorialism, Surrealism, and contemporary practitioners. Students are required to keep a notebook/journal of their experiments, and to present a final creative portfolio at the end of the term. Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation and one intermediate level photo course.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2013 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4321.01
  • Jonathan Kline | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4321.01

Hold Still, Keep Going

This advanced studio/seminar course examines the intersection between still and moving photography and provides a rigorous environment for cross-disciplinary dialogue. Students will pursue self-directed photo and/or video projects while developing a common critical vocabulary and communicative tools. Regular group discussion will challenge, complicate, clarify and deepen students understanding of their work in progress as they resolve its production both formally and conceptually. In addition to studio work outside of class, course members will engage with assigned readings and spend time writing about their own and each others art making practices. Students should emerge from this course with the ability to situate their work in relation to that of other artists, both contemporary and historical, as well as to some important critical texts. Class time will be devoted to large and small group critiques, artist presentations, discussions of texts, and the workshopping of writing. Prerequisites: Two 4000-level Photo and/or Video courses and permission of instructors.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4211.01
  • Warren Cockerham | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4211.01

Light and Lighting: Vocabulary and Tools

The course will investigate the way in which light conveys emotional, narrative, and psychological meaning. The goal is to increase students' experience in recognizing and shaping these effects. Slide lectures will draw from the history of photography, as well as cinema and contemporary art. Workshops will involve small collaborative teams in a variety of studio situations using the sun, tungsten and strobe lights. Polaroid film will allow immediate feedback. Group critiques will address form assignments within the student's chosen subject matter. Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4238.01

Lighting for Portraits

Created for students who have done previous course-work in basic photographic tools and technique, this hands-on lab will provide instruction and practice in continuous and strobe lighting equipment and provide an overview of lighting techniques for portraiture. Class work will include demonstrations and small group assignments in and out of the studio. The instructor will also provide technical support for self-designed projects. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Barber | SP2014 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | PHO2137.01

Photographic Portraiture: Friends & Strangers

This studio/seminar explores historical and contemporary practices in photographic portraiture, considering how photographers negotiate their relationships with their subjects. Assignments invite students to explore formal and conceptual strategies while readings provide theoretical context and encourage critical thinking about notions of truth, access, trust, and power. Written assignments will also be required. Class time will include slide presentations, group critiques and discussions, as well as technical instruction in digital photography, retouching, and inkjet printing. Self-directed final projects will allow students to creatively demonstrate their conceptual and technical skills as they explore their own questions and concerns. Prerequisites: Photography Foundation or Permission of the Instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO4262.01

Photographing Art Objects

This course will give students an understanding of how to present art-works in photographs. In this context, photography's role is utilitarian: to show a piece with some combination of clarity, honesty, and impact, to people who may never see the work in person. This is a skill-based endeavor, in which the goal is to thoroughly inform a viewer about the art-work without distractions, and the photograph succeeds or fails solely by how well it accomplishes that goal. Photographs of artwork must meet varying criteria, technical and aesthetic, if they will be crucial points of judgement leading to admission, grants, shows, etc. We will survey these requirements, de-code their language, and learn how to make submissions that comply. We will work with digital cameras, tripods, studio lighting tools, and varied lens focal lengths, to explore vantage points, the effect of varied lighting tools, perspective, selective sharpness, background choices and treatments, with some time spent on art-work outdoors. Students will work on a portfolio of images of art-work throughout the course. A digital single-lens reflex camera is required. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Barber | SP2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2111.01

Photography Foundation

The objective of this course is to provide the student with a proficiency in the basics of 35mm black and white photography. Class time will be spent working in the darkroom, lab demonstrations, and discussions of student work. In addition to technical lectures and reviews, a selection of images from the history of photography will be shown and discussed throughout the term. The slide presentations will introduce students to various photographic genres with an emphasis on contemporary practice. Reading assignments, and one writing assignment will also be part of this course. Prerequisites: None.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Liz Deschenes | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Jonathan Kline | FA2010 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Jonathan Kline | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Liz Deschenes | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Jonathan Kline | SP2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Liz Deschenes | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PHO2302.01
  • Jonathan Kline | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.02
  • Jonathan Kline | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2302.02

Photography in the Expanded Field

This course explores contemporary practices in photography and related media, including intersections with video, installation, performance, and collaborative social practices. A range of possibilities for the production, exhibition, and distribution of creative work will be discussed. Assignments invite students to explore formal and conceptual strategies while readings provide historical and theoretical context, encourage critical thinking about questions of labor and authorship, and examine the legacy of medium specificity. Class time will include slide presentations, group critiques, and discussions around socio-political and artistic considerations in contemporary photo-related practices. Students will make an oral presentation of independent research and can choose to pursue creative or analytical final projects. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4111.01

Photography's Relationship to Painting and Drawing

In this course, Photography's ongoing relationship to painting and drawing will be explored - specifically, how one medium has deeply influenced the other - allowing for ways of seeing and interpreting that have only become possible due to their symbiotic relationship. Students will make work that will allow them to better understand both mediums and their interconnectedness. Prerequisites: None.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2140.01

Photography: Installation, Sculpture, Performances

In this course, photography's relationship to the third dimension will be explored. Assignments and readings will address the photograph as object, photography's relationship to scale and measurement, photography as installation, and also its relationship to performance-based work. A final project of the student's choosing will reflect their developed interest in one of these diverse areas where photography and three-dimensionality intersect. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4273.01

Photography: Materials & Processes

This course explores the materiality of the photographic process from mechanical imaging using pinholes and optics, the creation of light sensitive film and paper emulsions, to the chemistry of black and white developers. As the industrialized era of photography fades into the past, we will experiment in our lab creating surfaces that are light sensitive, designing and fabricating camera devices, and formulating our own processing chemistry from scratch. Students are responsible for creating a final body of creative work, researching practitioners& processes, and discussing assigned readings by Jonathan Crary, Geoffrey Batchen, Charlotte Cotton, and others. Prerequisites: Foundation level Photography.

  • Jonathan Kline | SP2013 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4108.01

The Digital Photo Book

From photography's inception, photo books have been critical to the medium and have provided a way to understand our culture's use of images. In 1844 William Henry Fox Talbot utilized the book form with the first lens-based book, "The Pencil of Nature". In this course, students will explore the photo-based artist book as a vehicle for self-expression. A a variety of approaches to the photo book will be introduced through a mix of readings, presentations, assignments, and critiques. The class will cover a large scope of photography from pre-WWII books acting as markers of place and people such as Walker Evans' collaborative effort, "Let Us Now Famous Men", to various current versions of documentary projects rooted in personal observation. Careful attention will be given to books that help shape the field, including Robert Frank's "The Americans", along with many contemporary practitioners such as Larry Sultan, Wendy Ewald, Daido Moriyama, and Alec Soth. The ways in which photographs function and create meaning through sequence, narrative, design, and text within the book format will be examined. Students will be introduced to different ways of conceptualizing a book project, exploring a range of methods whether based through structuring a book by theme or with other approaches such as a nonlinear narrative. Through assignments students will learn basic skills in page layout software with Adobe InDesign. Photo-based books will be produced using a print-on-demand publisher such as Blurb, Adoramapix, or MagCloud. Prerequisites: PHO2302 Photography Foundation and at least one 4000 level studio photo course.

  • Jay Muhlin | SP2011 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4130.01
  • Jonathan Kline | FA2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4130.01

Visual Remix: Photography in the Digital Age

This class will explore the increasingly complex relationship between photography and digital culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the profound effect the shift from analog to digital technology has had on varying modes of image production and distribution. Among the many topics to be explored will be the relationship of digital imaging technologies to the diminishing veracity of the photographic image, the creative practice of appropriating, mixing and re-contextualizing fragments of digital culture, and the related issues of image authorship and copyright. Class time will be evenly divided between discussion/critique and hands-on studio work. In addition to reading a few short texts, we will look at and discuss a wide range of artists, including those committed to capturing the photographic "decisive moment" and others more interested in exploring the fictional, mutable qualities of the medium. While the focus of the class will be on photographic practice, we will also look at the increasingly blurred boundaries between traditional photography, time-based media, design software and Internet technologies. Class projects will be varied with students encouraged to apply material discussed in class to their own visual and conceptual interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Oliver Wasow | SP2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO4110.01

War/Disaster: The Ethics of the Photographer

This course will investigate our understanding of the role photography has played in representing recent conflicts, disasters, and social upheaval from around the world. Readings include Martha Rosler, Susan Sontag, AD Coleman, David Levi-Strauss, and others. Guests include picture editors, newspaper photographers, photojournalists, and documentarians. Films will also be scheduled to articulate particular points of view. Students are expected to complete either two photo projects or two seven-page papers in addition to weekly responses to the readings, films, and guests. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jonathan Kline | FA2010 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PHO2109.01

Printmaking

Advanced Printmaking Research and Group Exhibition

This course is an advanced printmaking research class. Within a basic structure of critiques and discussions, students will independently pursue their own research interests in a workshop environment. Demonstrations of techniques will be given according to the needs of the class. For the past numerous years, this class has culminated in a group exhibition in a local art space. Students with experience in diverse range media are encouraged to enroll. It is expected that all students will bring previous experience to class and thus be able to help with an interchange of ideas that will occur through attendance, presentations, critiques, participation and demonstrations. Around mid-term, students will also give a presentation of their work to the class. This is a rigorous class. Prerequisites: Two print classes at college level or equivalent advanced Visual Arts work or permission of the instructor.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2011 | F, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | PRI4402.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2010 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4402.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2013 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4402.01

Artists' Books

In this course is we will explore the many possibilities of the book as an artists medium. Students will make books but also study other artists' work in order to understand the extremely broad range of possibilities and approaches that can be taken to making artists' books. In this rigorous course, students will make a series of book projects. Some ideas explored will include book structures, relationships of form and content, the possibilities of text and image, history, collaboration, and distribution. Students will be required to bring some printing knowledge and/or experience with the book arts. Prerequisites: Minimum one print course at Bennington or Artists' Books & Zines or permission of the instructor.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4210.01

From Sketch to Print

This course is designed to be a preliminary investigation into printmaking through the creation of unique and small editioned prints. Emphasis will be placed on the development of states, working in series, and investigation through experience, sketching, memory, and the alteration of images. Printmaking mediums will include monotype, monoprint, and basic intaglio. Students are expected to keep a daily sketchbook in addition to developing print projects. This course meets the FIRST seven-weeks. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sarah Pike | FA2010 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2113.01

Introduction to Etching with a Multimedia Attitude

This class will cover traditional intaglio such as line etching, dry point, and aquatint while incorporating both soft and lift ground techniques. We will combine these processes with contemporary intaglio techniques such as collagraph and carborundum etching. Hand drawing with acrylic, gouache and watercolor on the prints will also be taught and encouraged. We will be using zinc, copper, steel, cardboard, and plastic to investigate these techniques with an emphasis on combining different plates to make a rich and layered image. However, there will be a series of projects that use each technique independently that will embellish the subtleties of each process. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sarah Amos | SP2013 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PRI2114.01

Introduction to Intaglio

This course is an introduction to Intaglio printing. This will include drypoint, various etching techniques, and basic color intaglio. Students will learn about Intaglio through demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Further study will occur through a series of projects outside of class. Students should find the parameters of these assignments broad enough to allow for customization to their own artistic interests. At the end of the semester, students will have the skills and a visual vocabulary necessary to create unique and editioned prints that combine technique and content coherently. Prerequisites: None.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2109.01

Introduction to Intaglio: The Alchemist's Print

This course is an introduction to copper plate Intaglio. We will explore various techniques to prepare our plates including hand working and acid etching with materials such as rosin resists and sugar lifts. By the end of term, we will be printing in color. Ultimately, the overall goal of our endeavors will be to begin a dialog about artistic production in a contemporary context while also exploring the unique history of the intaglio process. Prerequisites: None.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2111.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2111.01

Introduction to Relief Printing

This course is an introductory level print class. Students will learn about relief printmaking through demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Techniques include but are not limited to wood cut and linoleum cut. With this simple process, we will be able to explore color printing in depth. Prerequisites: None.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2105.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2105.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2105.01

Introduction to Relief Printing: The Woodcut

This is an introductory course in relief printmaking. Students will learn the basics of the traditional woodcut within the context of contemporary art making. Through demonstrations, hands on experience and critiques students will learn cutting techniques, about inks, paper and the use of etching presses to print images. Along with learning the technical aspects of relief printmaking, students will be expected to develop a series of black and white images that relate to one another thematically. Wood cut is a direct, simple and unique medium that is accessible to artists of all skill levels. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jesse Connor | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2120.01

Lithography with a 21st Century Makeover

This class will introduce students to the wonderful world of stone and plate lithography and its unique alchemy. This advanced class is for those artists who love to draw as both stone and plate lithography render the most beautiful subtle surfaces with the most unusual of drawing materials. Each week we will work on a specific project that will be discussed in group tutorials where we will as a group slowly work our way through this most technical of printmaking processes. This class will also incorporate other suitable printmaking processes and hand drawing techniques that will enhance and add another dimension to our lithographs. A large scale multi-media print will also be undertaken for the last project. Prerequisites: one printmaking course and permission of the instructor.

  • Sarah Amos | SP2013 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | PRI4206.01

Photographs With Ink: Photo-Based Intaglio Methods

Printmaking and photography have many parallels. Recently developed technologies and techniques provide many ways for artists to explore the relationships between these media. This intermediate level class will focus on photographic methods that use printing inks. We will use copper plates, photopolymer gravure plates, and possibly others such as Imagon. We will create both photographic and hand-made films, using drawing and collage, to expose on these plates and use them to delve into multi-plate printing in layers. Our explorations into these techniques will drive an ongoing conversation about manipulating and reading images, which will occur in class discussions and critiques. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4205.01

Printmaking Assemblage

This course is about expanding the possibility of the print. Students will bring to class various levels of printmaking experience, and be challenged to look beyond a traditional approach to printmaking. Demonstrations will be given in intaglio, monotype, and woodcut. The prints created will be viewed as an effective means of generating pattern, texture, density and rhythm in an image. Projects will be designed to encourage an exploration of the multimedia, assemblage process. We will combine elements of print, drawing and painting to produce unique works. This class will emphasize the value of the unexpected, whether it refers to the size, shape, or unique combination of materials in the finished piece. Each student will not only demonstrate their ability to create a printed image, but their willingness to improvise, and revise in response to an ongoing, in class dialogue about their work. Intermediate to advanced students will find this class appropriately challenging and supportive. Prerequisites: Previous print course at the college and permission of print faculty.

  • Jesse Connor | FA2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4115.01

Projects in Lithography

This course is an introduction to lithographic processes. Students will start by processing and printing images from limestone and end the semester by exploring the possibilities of making positive films to expose modern lithographic plates. This studio class is structured around a number of projects each one ending with a group critique. Students should find the parameters of these assignments broad enough to allow for customization to their own artistic interests and are expected to bring additional content to their work from outside the classroom. At the end of the term, students will have the skills and visual vocabulary to continue making lithographs. Prerequisites: Into to Printmaking

  • Thorsten Dennerline | SP2014 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4203.01

Screenprinting Workshop

This is an intensive course focusing on the basic technical processes of screen printing including: screen preparation, image development, registration, paper handling, and printing multi run prints. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students will complete a series of projects using block out methods and photo emulsion. Particular emphasis will be placed on color interaction, mixing, and layering. Students should expect to be working on both independent and collaborative projects. Prerequisites: None. Note: This course will be offered the first seven weeks and again the second seven weeks.

  • Sarah Pike | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2103.01
  • Sarah Pike | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2103.01
  • Sarah Pike | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2103.02

Silkscreen / Serigraphy Workshop

This course will focus on the basic technical processes of screen printing including, screen preparation, image development, registration, paper handling, and printing multi run prints. Through demonstrations and hands on experiences students will complete a series of projects using block out methods and photo emulsion by creating hand-drawn and digital films. Particular emphasis will be placed on color interaction, mixing, and layering. Students should expect to be working on both independent and collaborative projects. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sarah Pike | FA2010 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.01
  • Sarah Pike | FA2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.01
  • Sarah Pike | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.01
  • Sarah Pike | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.01
  • Sarah Pike | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.02
  • Sarah Pike | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2112.02

Stone Lithography Workshop

Working with the principle that grease and water repel each other this course will introduce students to the technical aspects of stone lithography. Students will learn about stone preparation, image development and processing, printing, paper handling, and editing. Through demonstrations and hands on experience students will complete series of skill based projects working with lithographic crayons, pencils, and subtractive tools. This course is well suited to students who thrive working in mediums that challenge them both physically and mentally. This class meets the FIRST seven weeks. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sarah Pike | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI2208.01

Unique Prints: 3-D Prints, and Modular Works

This course is an introduction to unique prints, or prints that are not necessarily printed as an edition. We will emphasize the making of mixed media prints using a broad range of methods from monotypes to digital prints. The class is structured around a series of projects where rigorous experimentation is encouraged. Students will learn various non-typical printmaking methods through a straightforward format of demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Techniques will include monotype, polyester laser plates, and various transfer techniques. Additionally, we will explore the possibilities of 3-dimentional applications for prints. This can include anything from books, paper cups, matchbooks, modular installations, appropriated prints and wallpapers. We may also be collaborating on projects with other classes or universities. Prerequisites: One print class at college level.

  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4272.01
  • Thorsten Dennerline | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PRI4272.01

Sculpture

Building/Materials: Metalshop

This course is recommended for all students considering working in sculpture. It is open to other students who are curious about the natural characteristics of materials and the building process. This course will include introductions to gas and electric welding, forging and general shop safety. This course is project-based and students are evaluated on their ability to use the shop tools with proficiency and safety. Prerequisites: None.

  • John Umphlett | FA2011 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2209.01
  • John Umphlett | FA2012 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2209.01

Building/Materials: Woodshop

This seven-week course is recommended for students interested in developing their technical skills in sculpture beyond basic contractor methods. There will be a fundamental introduction to working with wood and general shop safety, with a focus on design in conjunction with woodworking techniques. Processes such as joinery, lathing, scraping, and laminating will be covered, among others. The course is project-based. Students will be evaluated on their ability to use shop tools with proficiency and safety. Prerequisites: None.

  • John Umphlett | SP2011 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2210.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2012 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2210.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2013 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2210.01

Close Encounters ... Solving the Impossible

Can artists contribute in some significant way to effect change at a social or political level? We will look at a range of artists from the 18th to 21st centuries who have attempted to make significant contributions to social change. We will examine how the issues, methods of working, narratives, media, and approaches have been effective. This includes but is not limited to Goya's painting 'The 3rd of May', Marinetti and the Futurist movement, Picasso's "Guernica," Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Di Suvero's "Peace Tower", The 'Art Workers' Coalition-a short-lived organization founded in 1969 to protest the war, Barbara Kruger, and Maya Lin. Through a series projects, we will make work based on these artists' visual interventions. The emphasis will be on experimentation through traditional materials such as wood, steel, plaster, clay and non-traditional methods and materials including functional objects, temporal work in the environment, installation and performance. Drawing practices will also be an intrinsic part of this focused exploration. Researching the varying artists' histories will be essential. For the second seven weeks, the class will merge with Susan Sgorbati's class MED4103 Solving the Impossible, where students will collaborate on projects that imagine their own strategic non-violent encounters and present them to the public. The practical and aesthetic implications of their ideas and the efficacy of their methods to solve the impossible will be evaluated and critiqued. This class is 14-week intensive, meeting twice weekly; students will be expected to complete a significant amount of work out side of the class meeting times. . Regular slide presentations will compliment individual and group critiques. Prerequisites: One introductory sculpture course.

  • Jon Isherwood | FA2010 | MW, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4215.01

Close Encounters: Artists Affecting Change

Can Artists contribute in some significant way to effect change at a social or political level? We will look at a range of artists from the 18th to 21st Centuries who have attempted to make significant contributions to depict human atrocities. We will examine how the issues, methods of working, narratives, media, and approaches have been effective. This includes but is not limited to Goya's painting 'The 3rd of May', Marinetti and the Futurist movement, Picasso's "Guernica," Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Di Suvero's "Freedom Tower", The 'Art Workers' Coalition-a short-lived organization founded in 1969 to protest the war, Barbara Kruger, and Maya Lin . Through a series projects, we will make sculptural responses based on these artist's visual interventions. The emphasis will be on experimentation through traditional materials such as wood, steel, plaster, clay and non-traditional methods and materials including functional objects, temporal work in the environment, installation and performance. Drawing practices will also be an intrinsic part of this focused exploration. Researching the varying artists' histories will be essential. Prerequisities: None.

  • Jon Isherwood | SP2013 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | SCU2126.01

Field Research of Closed Cells - Part 1

This class will push the envelope of closed membrane structure design. A membrane is more than an impermeable skin; it can selectively filter particles, chemicals, light, sound, and smell. A balloon has an expandable latex surface easily manipulated by air and water pressure. However, a rigid fabric material that has a less forgiving response to pressure forced on its walls affords more control of form through the fabrication methods within its structure. What is the process to develop a form with an inner structure that primarily exists as an environment shifted slightly from its exterior? In the prototyping stages, it will be important to experiment in the regulation of these pressures along with changes in the material structure of the forms themselves. The first seven weeks will be focused primarily on hand building fabrication methods, including Origami folding, adaptive creasing, casting flexible materials, and welding methods for a variety of plastics. Along with understanding the material properties in practice, we will be researching pattern design and skinning techniques by using 3D modeling and digital fabrication techniques to push patterning beyond analog capabilities and to visualize forms. The final project is a result of all that was learned in the class and for each student to have designed and made a flexible space "cell". Prerequisites: None.

  • Guy Snover | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU2119.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU2119.01

Field Research of Closed Cells - Part 2

This class will be fabricating a large inflatable structure (ultimate synthesis of the first seven weeks). The first two classes will be dedicated to critical discussions on form, membrane properties, and the final showing environment. The chosen form will be digitized and the 3D model will be used to leverage logistics of the large form and patterning. The digital model will then be transferred to an analog construction process. The size and complexity of the large cell will be a function of student participation. The more fabricators we have, the bigger we go. This intensive compilation of group research and collaborative manufacturing will culminate in a public celebration of the cell at the end of term. Prerequisites: Required: first seven week course, Field Research of Closed Cells/Part 1.

  • Guy Snover | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU4119.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2014 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU4119.01

Fundamentals of Spatial Thinking and Making

Objects guide and define human activity and interactions. On a daily basis, we encounter and navigate thousands of manipulated spatial conditions, from highways, to landscapes, to tableware. How our dimensional reality shapes our experiences is defined by our ability to engage, understand and even alter these conditions. This is a foundational course in three dimensional art. Students will learn to observe, interpret, and make art objects through a series of projects in both the ceramics and sculpture disciplines. Central to this process will be the study of history, drawing, and learning to use various tools and materials. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2012 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01

Idiosyncratic Tools

Use a hammer to hit a nail into a chunk of wood. Anyone may smash a cube of ice, carve a toy car or with strong encouragement, allow the hammer to sign its initials on your thumb - VBS (violet burning sunset.) Idiosyncratic devices enhance one's own senses. Once we completely understand the specific functions for which a tool is designed, we begin to tune senses back to the makers' concepts. Too often do we rely on the discoveries of others in order to perform daily tasks. Rather than finding solutions that seem comfortable, we will set limitations to challenge ourselves to use what is around us. Class time will be allotted to the discussion of idiosyncratic devices as well as tool design and concepts that support specific material selection. The student will also be responsible for consistently drawing and refining the work in sketchbook. Prerequisites: One visual arts studio course. and familiarity with the wood shop tools.

  • John Umphlett | SP2011 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4216.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2012 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4216.01
  • John Umphlett | SP2013 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4216.01

Introduction to Rhino 3D Modeling

Rhino 3D Modeling is a foundational course in Rhinoceros modeling software. Rhinoceros, used by architects, artists, and designers, is now standard software for anyone modeling three-dimensional form. As an accurate and flexible tool, Rhino provides users with workflows for solid modeling, polygonal modeling, and organic NURBS surface modeling. This course covers a broad range of modeling techniques and lays a strong foundation for continued work in 3D modeling. Students complete predefined modeling tasks, as well as create original works of their own design. The term will culminate with a final project that is fully modeled in Rhino and fabricated using laser cutting and 3D printing. Prerequisites: None.

  • Guy Snover | SP2014 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU2112.01
  • Guy Snover | FA2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2113.01
  • Guy Snover | SP2013 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2113.01
  • Guy Snover | FA2013 | F, 8:10AM-12:00PM | VA2113.01

Introduction to Sculpture: What is Sculpture?

How do we make it? How do we talk about it? And what does it mean? This course invites students to investigate the fundamental principles of sculpture while encouraging the exploration of classical and contemporary approaches. There will be projects covering a variety of techniques and materials including plaster, wood, cardboard, clay,styrofoam, and metal. Regular slide presentations complement individual and group critiques. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jon Isherwood | SP2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | SCU2101.01
  • Jon Isherwood | SP2012 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | SCU2101.01

Metal Workshop

This course is recommended for all students considering working in sculpture. It is open to other students with a curiosity about materials and building processes. There are fundamental introductions to gas and electric welding, forging, fabrication techniques, and general shop safety. This class meets for the first 7 weeks of the term. Prerequisites: None.

  • John Umphlett | FA2013 | F, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2206.01
  • John Umphlett | FA2010 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU2206.01

Metal Workshop Part II

For the second seven weeks we will develop skills in working with equipment that lends itself to non- ferrous metals, other exotic alloys, and stainless steel. We will gain knowledge of GTAW welding in the areas of direct current electrode negative (DCEN), direct current electrode positive (DCEP), and also AC welding. With new technologies we are able to adjust the output frequency of AC welding and broaden the possibilities of fabrication. Along with the welding capabilities that will be taught, appropriate preparation and clean-up processes will be practiced. Prerequisites: SCU2209 Building/Materials: Metalshop.

  • John Umphlett | FA2013 | F, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4110.01
  • John Umphlett | FA2010 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4110.01
  • John Umphlett | FA2011 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4110.01
  • John Umphlett | FA2012 | Th, 8:00AM-12:00PM | SCU4110.01

Projects in Sculpture: Making It Personal

The question is what do you want to say? As we develop our interests in sculpture it becomes more and more imperative to find our own voice. The role of the artist is to interpret personal conditions and experiences and find the most affecting expression for them. This course provides the opportunity for a self-directed study in sculpture. Students are expected to produce a significant amount of work outside of regular class meetings. The goal is for students to become fully versed in the issues that define traditional and contemporary sculpture. Regular individual and bi-weekly group critiques will be complemented by student presentations of issues pertaining to their work. Students will be expected to attend field trips to museums and galleries. A final exhibition and a self-evaluation are required. Prerequisites: One introductory class, two intermediate classes, demonstration of advanced work in visual arts.

  • Jason Middlebrook | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | SP2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01
  • Jon Isherwood | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | SCU4797.01

Social Life of Sculpture

This class aims to explore opportunities for making and locating sculpture in a broader socio-cultural context. In-class presentations and discussions are structured to identify important examples of contemporary art practice and serve as a platform for the exchange of ideas and debate. Students will pursue projects that expand considerations of public audience engagement. We will investigate various approaches including public service, distribution, object dispatch, wearable sculpture, performative work, site-specific temporary structure and mobile phenomena, among others. While exercising material experimentation and learning inter-disciplinary practices, students are encouraged to work collaboratively and to develop strategies to pursue off-campus projects. Prerequisites: Two sculpture classes and permission of instructor.

  • Yoko Inoue | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | SCU4106.01

What is Sculpture?

How do we make it? How do we talk about it? And what does it mean? How do we make objects in space? Is gravity our friend or foe? This course invites students to investigate the fundamental principlals of sculpture while encouraging exploration of classical and contemporary approaches. Sessions are intensive explorations into a variety of techniques and materials including plaster, wood, cardboard, styrofoam and metal. There will be a strong emphasis on drawing and how drawing plays a key role in the making of sculpture. Regular slide presentations compliment individual group critiques. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jason Middlebrook | FA2013 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | SCU2106.01

Visual Art

A Survey of Avant-Garde Exhibitions

This course will examine a selection of art exhibitions in Europe and the United States from the middle of the 19th century to the early 2000s. The course will focus on controversial exhibitions associated with individuals and movements such as Gustave Courbet, douard Manet, Impressionism, Fauvism, the Armory Show, Alfred Stieglitz, German Expressionism, Surrealism, Dadaism, the Bauhaus, Peggy Guggenheim, Julien Levy, Andy Warhol, Arnold Lehman and others. It will consider how exhibitions are not only reflections of artistic life but shaped by political, social and cultural forces that have, over time, affected the history of modern art. Building on this historical base, the course will conclude with discussions about contemporary exhibitions, specifically considering the globalization of art fostered by commercial and institutional enterprises such as the Guggenheim Museum, Venice Biennale, Gagosian, etc. Prerequisites: None.

  • Carol Stakenas | SP2014 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA2109.01

Advanced Workshop for Painting and Drawing

This course is for experienced student artists with a firm commitment to serious work in the studio. Students will work primarily on self-directed projects in an effort to refine individual concerns and subject matter. Students will present work regularly for critique in class as well as for individual studio meetings with the instructor. Development of a strong work ethic will be crucial. There will be an emphasis on the growth of each student's critical abilities, the skills to think clearly and speak articulately about one's own work and the work of others. There will be supplemental readings, student research and presentations about the work of 20th and 21st century artists. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor prior to registration.

  • Ann Pibal | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | PAI4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4404.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4404.01

Advanced Workshop in the Visual Arts

This class welcomes students from all of the visual arts disciplines, who are interested in working and discussing work in an interdisciplinary environment. We will look at work that is, and is not medium specific, in order to understand the power that can come from combining elements from more than one media. We will concurrently look at how site and site specificity affects and influences this way of working. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2010 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4205.01

Art in America Since WWII

After WWII, artists in U. S. cities played a major role in the transformation of contemporary art from Modernism to Post Modernism and the present. As a survey, this course looks at several of these artists' works and their connections to important movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and the proliferation of later movements including Photo Realism, Minimalism, Feminist Art, Process Art, Earth Art, New Image Painting, Neo Expressionism, East Village Art, Identity Art and more. New York City as one of the world-class art centers is used as a focus for retracing these developments in order to gain a closer understanding and appreciation. Slide/digital presentations, weekly readings, student presentations and group discussions are the format of this class. Prerequisites: None.

  • Andrew Spence | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | AH2286.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | AH2286.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | AH2286.01
  • Andrew Spence | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2286.01

Artist's Portfolio

Explaining art work often goes against the grain, yet artists are regularly called upon to articulate their processes, tools, and dynamics of collaboration. To help secure any of the myriad forms of institutional support including funding, venues, and engagements, artists must develop, creatively and flexibly, essential skills. Finding a public language for what is the private process of creation is an art in itself. Furthermore, understanding and discovering ways to adapt to changing economic realities is a critical component of making work; bringing the work into the world is a natural part of the artist's process. This course addresses basic issues involved in generating, developing, producing, and presenting art work. Students will write artist statements, press releases, biographical statements, resumes, c.v.'s, grants and cover letters; will prepare budgets, will organize promotional portfolios/videotapes; will interview each other; and will give short lecture demonstrations. Prerequisites: Advanced level work in one of the art forms. Permission of the instructor.

  • Dana Reitz | FA2012 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | DAN4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2013 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | DAN4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2010 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MUS4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2011 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4366.01

Chromophilia: Explorations in Color

Chromophilia, a term coined by contemporary aesthetic philosopher David Batchelor, refers to intense passion and love for color. What is it about color that has the power to induce reverie, and conversely to manipulate, or disgust? How de we understand and respond to color from philosophical, phenomenological, and cultural vantage points? How as artists can we become the master of our passionately-loved and yet ever-shifting chroma? In this class, we look carefully at and discuss the work of many artists and the implications of color in their images. Readings from Goethe, Wittgenstein, Baudelaire, Albers, Batchelor, and others serve as a base for discussion and artistic response. Visual work using a variety of materials including cut paper, water-based paint, and mixed-media will be the primary focus of the class. In addition, reading assignments as well as written responses will be assigned weekly. Class time is primarily used for discussion and critique, presentations, and demonstration of materials. Although assignments are given, it is the objective of this class to provide the skills necessary for the student to confidently pursue self-designed projects. A high degree of motivation is expected. Prerequisites: Two courses in Visual Arts, and permission of the instructor.

  • Ann Pibal | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4215.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4215.01
  • Ann Pibal | SP2012 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4215.01

Color Investigated Through Light

This course will focus on examples and strategies of the various disciplines that have used light and color as a central component to their work- we will closely look at photographers, light installation artists, and film and video artists. Students will be given short assignments in the first seven weeks and a project based on their inquiries (approved by the faculty) member for the 2nd half of term. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4108.01

Critical Inquiry in the Visual Arts

This class welcomes students from all of the Visual Arts disciplines who are interested in working and discussing work in an interdisciplinary environment. We will embark upon the question and development of inquiry and research that arises in the Visual Arts through readings and presentations by both the students and the instructor of this course. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2011 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4150.01

Critical Texts in Recent Art

This course is a reading seminar of important texts on art and culture by critics, theorists and artists from late modernism through postmodernism to the present moment. It will include close readings and discussions of essays by Michael Fried, Rosalind Krauss, Robert Smithson, Brian ODoherty, Hal Foster, Susan Sontag, Jacques Rancire, Pascal Gielen, Markus Miessen, Maria Lind and Simon Sheikh to consider changing conditions under which art is conceived, produced and distributed. The departure point for the course is Fried's seminal essay Art and Objecthood (1967), which condemned the solicitation of the spectator in Minimalist art and subsequently generated a discourse on the autonomous position of art. That discourse continues to resonate today, and with this in mind the course will pay particular attention to changing roles of the spectator from an indifferent position to a more integrated participant in contemporary artistic practices. Prerequisites: Yes. Preferably third / fourth years with prior course in art history / philosophy / or equivalent.

  • James Voorhies | SP2013 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA4154.01
  • James Voorhies | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4154.01

Daily Document

How does one develop a vital creative inquiry? How can a direct connection be made between daily life and making art, between personal and public or political worlds? Students will create systems of documentation and approaches to 'autobiography' using one or more media. In addition to class assignments which address time, sequence and series, students will work for the full seven weeks with a self-designed daily practice. There will be formal group critiques as well as discussions of assigned research and reading. Weekly presentations of contemporary artists will provide a platform for our investigations. Prerequisites: Two courses in any area of visual arts at Bennington.

  • Ann Pibal | FA2012 | M, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4120.01

Exploring the White Cube: A New York Intensive

This class will meet weekly to explore contemporary art exhibitions in New York. We will visit commercial galleries and non-profit art spaces in Midtown, Chelsea, the Lower East Side, and Brooklyn, as well as major museums. Relevant findings will be assigned and short response papers will be required. Students will be responsible for their own expenses, including transportation and museum admissions, however eforrts will be made to keep admission at a minimum. Additional exhibitions, evens, and performances will be recommended. Prerequsites: At least one Visual Art or Art History course and permission of the instructor.

  • Elizabeth White | FA2013 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4125.01
  • Elizabeth White | SP2014 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4125.01

Form to Function/ Digital Design to Analog Build

The practice of functional objectmaking is undergoing an intense transition into digital production. Additive manufacturing has been posed as the next trilliondollar business; in your lifetime you will be able to download objectstables, chairs, clocksand manufacture them in your own home. Designers, architects, and artists are finding digital design and fabrication processes to be common ground for communication and collaboration, in large part because many new projects necessitate multidimensional thinking about form and making. Through a series of discrete exercises coupling digital fabrication and design techniques with analog processes, students in this course will gain familiarity with digital space and creative systems thinking and analog build processes. Students will design solutions to extant problems using digital modeling software; these digital designs will then be translated into Functional analog objects by way of hand, machine, and robotic tools. We will observe the multiple transitions from digital to analog, with a keen eye toward understanding the qualities of each state (if indeed they can be neatly separated. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jon Isherwood | SP2013 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2206.01

Fundamentals of Spatial Thinking and Making

Objects guide and define human activity and interactions. On a daily basis, we encounter and navigate thousands of manipulated spatial conditions, from highways, to landscapes, to tableware. How our dimensional reality shapes our experiences is defined by our ability to engage, understand and even alter these conditions. This is a foundational course in three dimensional art. Students will learn to observe, interpret, and make art objects through a series of projects in both the ceramic and sculpture disciplines. Central to this process will be the study of history, drawing, and learning to use various tools and materials. Prerequisites: None.

  • Barry Bartlett | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | CER2116.01
  • Barry Bartlett | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2011 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01
  • Jon Isherwood | FA2012 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | VA2115.01

History of Western Art I

This course will trace the development of visual culture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Christian to Romanesque, Gothic and early Renaissance art. It will acquaint students with the history of art primarily in the west through the study of works of art and architecture and key political, social and religious frameworks that produced them. The course will use contemporary contexts such as repatriation, museum acquisitions, cultural tourism, popular culture, and artistic and architectural practices as points of departure for these studies. Subjects related to patronage, economy, gender, and the emergent identity of the singular artist will be integrated into discussions. Prerequisites: None.

  • James Voorhies | FA2011 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | AH2105.01
  • James Voorhies | FA2010 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | AH2105.01
  • James Voorhies | SP2013 | TTh, 8:00AM-10:00AM | VA2106.01

History of Western Art II

This course is a study of a history of western art from the Renaissance to Postmodernism within the contexts of contemporary art, politics and culture. It examines art from the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classicism and Romanticism through Realism, Impressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism and Surrealism, concluding with Postmodernism. Major topics include the impact throughout these periods that politics, technology, urbanism, race, gender, sexuality, class, war have on the production of art. The course addresses relevant contemporary contexts and intersections as means to initiate discussions, understanding and relevance of the historical material. Students learn to identify and discuss the styles of individual artists, movements and mediums. They learn to analyze a work of art within a history of visual culture. Prerequisites: None.

  • James Voorhies | SP2012 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | AH2106.01
  • James Voorhies | SP2011 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | AH2106.01
  • James Voorhies | SP2013 | TTh, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2107.01

Inquiry in the Visual Arts

This class welcomes students from all of the Visual Arts disciplines who are interested in working and discussing work in an interdisciplinary environment. The course will have two main components that will interspersed throughout the course. Students will learn about how to research for the visual artist. Simultaneously, we will look at how to embark upon inquiry through a series of assignments that will be decided upon by the concerns of the students in the course. Students will present their research in response to their inquiries while we critically investigate assignments for the studio. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2012 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4160.01

Inter-Locking Structures

This is an intermediate/advanced course for developing hand-building techniques and casting methods in making functional or sculptural objects. The focus will be on making complex forms by joining modular components, inventing stacking methods and using interlocking devices. Students will also be encouraged to combine other mediums and to bring an inter-disciplinary approach to bear on the project. A research assignment will be incorporated in this course to assist in the conceptual development. This class is for intermediate and advanced ceramics and sculpture students. Basic knowledge of clay mixing , glaze application and firing is required for this class. Prerequisites: An introductory level, four-credit ceramic course.

  • Yoko Inoue | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4110.01

Interdisciplinary Studio: Context & Original Docs

This multi-disciplinary studio seminar course will take as its platform the investigation of writing by artists about art and artists. Students will read primary documents of art history - artists' essays, letters and sketchbooks, while developing and re-presenting their own self-defined studio projects. We will work to establish a sense of historical context for our own endeavors in the studio through examining both the impetus behind artists' work and also the connections and interactions between artists, designers, writers, and performers. We will begin by studying the writings of many 20th century artists who are known for their facility not only with images and or objects, but also with words. Among these are Cezanne, Van Gogh, Philip Guston, Josef Beuys, Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, Robert Irwin, Robert Smithson, Donald Judd, Louise Bourgeois, and Agnes Martin. We will also take a close look at contemporary artists who have synthesized the practice of writing into their overall investigations including: Michelle Grabner, David Humphrey, Amy Sillman, Liam Gillick, Carrie Moyer and R.H. Quaytman. In addition to shared reading, writing and discussion, students will create visual presentations and will conduct a significant research project of their own, which traces a lineage from their own studio projects, back through time, creating a kind of personal 'story of art'. Pre-requisites: Permission of Instructor During Registration Period

  • Ann Pibal | FA2013 | T, 8:20AM-12:00PM | VA4123.01

Introduction to Rhino 3D Modeling

Rhino 3D Modeling is a foundation course in Rhinoceros modeling software. Rhinoceros, used by architects, artists, and designers, is now standard software for anyone modeling three-dimensional form. As an accurate and flexible tool, Rhino provides users with workflows for solid modeling, polygonal modeling, and organic NURBS surface modeling. This course covers a broad range of modeling techniques and lays a strong foundation for continued work in 3D modeling. Students complete predefined modeling tasks, as well as create original works of their own design. The term will culminate with a final project that is fully modeled in Rhino and fabricated using laser cutting and 3D printing. Prerequisites: None.

  • Guy Snover | SP2014 | Th, 8:20AM-12:00PM | SCU2112.01
  • Guy Snover | FA2012 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2113.01
  • Guy Snover | SP2013 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2113.01
  • Guy Snover | FA2013 | F, 8:10AM-12:00PM | VA2113.01

Library City: A New Atlas for Crossett

This course will inhabit the library as a 21st century city of knowledge. After introductory lectures and readings about contemporary cities and libraries, students will spend the term mapping highly individual paths of research through the collections of Crossett Library. Intensive directed reading and looking, will result in the creation of written and visual essays, through which relationships will be built between a range of subjects and forms. Each students inquiry will be iterative, and research methods idiosyncratic. The results of this research will take form in small books and zines, made regularly throughout the course, and weekly group discussions of findings. In the way that much research today contains many voices, a collaborative atlas of the Crossett library/city will be made, in addition to the individual bodies of work. Students taking this course should be highly self-motivated, curious, have a good familiarity with image making, and be ready to read, write/make and speak weekly. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Mary Lum | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4109.01

Light Art

What is light art? How does one look at, think about, and describe this inherently cross-disciplinary medium? We will start with a look at some prominent light artists, such as Olafur Eliasson, James Turrell, Dan Flavin, Jenny Holzer and others who have worked with light bulbs, projection and/or daylight, followed by a brief look at the work of acclaimed cinematographers. Participants will learn to respond critically to these images, both in presentations and in writing; will learn the fundamentals of operating common light sources, including incandescent, fluorescent and LED; and then will design and make light art pieces of their own. Prerequisites: None.

  • Michael Giannitti | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DRA2228.01
  • Michael Giannitti | SP2011 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | DRA2228.01

Rules of Engagement: Art & Curatorial Practices

This seminar investigates the creation and curation of contemporary art in the public realm from the 1960s to present day through the work of a range of artists from Allan Kaprow, Border Arts Workshop, Adrian Piper, Group Material, Suzanne Lacy and Mel Chin to Wafaa Bilal, Blast Theory, Andrea Fraser, Jeanne van Heeswijk, Pablo Helguera, Ultra-red and more. The class will address the various ways that curators, organizations and funders work to bring together artists and audiences in the public realm by looking at the work of curator Mary Jane Jacob and her landmark project "Culture in Action", Okwui Enwezor's Documenta 11 as well as the long term work of Creative Time, the Queens Museum and Appal Shop. Core areas of investigation include projects that emerge from situation, circumstance and event, models fro public engagement including social practice, institutional critique, cross sector collaborations with urban planning, architecture and design as well as engaging controversy and managing conflict. "Rules of Engagement" is intended for those interested in considering an expanded field of roles to be played in the contemporary art world within and beyond of the highly visible international art market. Class time will be devoted to lectures, screenings, discussions of weekly readings, as well as both team-based and individual presentations. Prerequisites: Previous art history or philosophy. Permission of the instructor.

  • Carol Stakenas | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4122.01

Social Practices in Art

Social practices in art incorporates many diverse strategies from interactive media, online networks, manifestos, street interventions, social sculpture, design, performance, activism, open systems, public discourse and more. In this course we examine the history of social practice and focus in on how media and technology are impacting and shifting current practice. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively on projects that critically engage topics pertinent to this moment in history and are situated in the public sphere -- local or global, online or offline. There are lectures, reading assignments, studio projects and critiques during the course. Students from beyond the visual arts are encouraged to register. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Robert Ransick | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | APA4104.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4104.01
  • Robert Ransick | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4104.01

Sound Installation

In this course we'll examine and create sound pieces that differ from traditional musical performances in that they are longer, larger, and/or (more directly) interactive. Topics will include: process music and algorithmic composition; mechanized and computerized sound making; strategies for remote power, processing and amplification; sensors. Students will critique representative works and create their own, culminating in an end-of-term exhibition. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Jeff Feddersen | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4151.01

Take It Outside: Art In Public Space

This course will take shape through a series of readings, screenings, conversations and look at curatorial projects related to artists who utilize public space and social context to produce work. Examining the period covering the last 35 years, but concentrating mostly on the past decade, the course will consider artists ranging from Group Material, Art Workers' Coalition, Martha Rosler, Joseph Beuys and Allan Kaprow to Jeremy Deller, N55, Temporary Services, Harrell Fletcher, Guerilla Art Action Group, Red76, Claire Fontaine and more. Alongside discussions about these artists and their practices will be a consideration of the role of the institution of art - meaning exhibition sites, curators, donors, collectors, critics, installers, boards of trustees and media sponsors - and the effect it has on practices that work outside the white cube. Inquiries will be made into how and why process- and knowledge-based practices are supported by the art world. Conversations about these topics will include engagements with artists. Prerequisites: At least one prior course in Visual Art and permission of the instructor.

  • James Voorhies | FA2010 | F, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4103.01

The Archive in Art

This seven-week course is an introduction to the archive and how it has been central to artistic production of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will read Walter Benjamins Archive, Archive Fever: Uses of The Document in Contemporary Art, and conclude with The Big Archive. There will be lectures on how the archive exists in specific artists works. Students will be given short research assignments that will allow them to conclude the seminar with presentations of their own. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor.

  • Liz Deschenes | FA2013 | M, 6:30PM-10:10PM | VA4216.01

The Body Acoustic: Toward a Sense of Place

How do we physically understand the spaces we are in? How is each of us affected by them? How do we develop a deeper sense of place? The Body Acoustic aims to heighten awareness of the reciprocal relationship between the built environment and our senses. Light and sound, distances, height, volume, surfaces, angles/curves and a/symmetries all affect our movement through interior and exterior spaces; our movement, in turn, affects the perception of these spaces. Using methodologies from visual and movement-based art forms, The Body Acoustic provides an opportunity for students of any discipline to engage in trans-disciplinary research and practice. Throughout the course, students will graphically articulate their experiences inhabiting multiple spaces (i.e. drawing, photo collage), design, and make simple situations/spaces to move through and will determine short scenes/movement studies to influence our sense of place. Students will form teams to complete short on-site exercises and will share results of other assigned exercises through discussion and presentation. Criteria for evaluation include participation in all class sessions and discussions, satisfactory completion of all assignments, and active participation in all reviews of student work. Prerequisites: None.

  • Dana Reitz | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DAN2112.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2010 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DAN2112.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | DAN2112.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | VA2112.01

The Magical Object - Intermediate Level

There is a great difference between a prop and an object on stage that is built or filled with the dramatic forces of a play. Such objects become metaphors, they become fresh comprehensions of the world. In the theatre, we believe in magic. Our gaze is focused on ordinary objects...a glass figurine, a pair of shoes, a wedding dress...and then our attention is shaped, and charged, and we watch the everyday grow in meaning and power. Most of our greatest plays, written by our most poetic playwrights, contain a visual metaphor, an object with metaphorical weight that we can see on stage, not just in our mind's eye. How do we make the ordinary into the extraordinary? How do we create something that can carry meaning across the stage, into the audience and then out of the theatre, all the way home, and into the lives of these strangers who come to sit together in the dark? How do we generate a magical object on stage? Students will read five plays, write a critical paper, write a small play that contains a magical object, and, as their final project, build/create that magical object. Prerequisites: Students interested in taking this course must email a five-page sample of their work to SKramer@bennington.edu by Novmber 1. Since the final project is the making of a magical object, affinity for and facility with the making of things (architecture, painting, sculpting, ceramics, etc.) is strongly encouraged.

  • Sherry Kramer | SP2011 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRA4116.01

The Magical Object - Visual Metaphor

There is a great difference between a prop and an object on stage that is built or filled with the dramatic forces of a play. Such objects become metaphors, they become fresh comprehensions of the world. In the theater, we believe in magic. Our gaze is focused on ordinary objects...a glass figurine, a pair of shoes, a wedding dress...and then our attention is shaped, and charged, and we watch the everyday grow in meaning and power. Most of our greatest plays, written by our most poetic playwrights, contain a visual metaphor, an object with metaphorical weight that we can see on stage, not just in our mind's eye. How do we make the ordinary into the extraordinary? How do we create something that can carry meaning across the stage, into the audience and then out of the theater, all the way home, and into the lives of these strangers who come to sit together in the dark? How do we generate a magical object on stage? Students will read five plays, write a small play that contains a magical object, and, as their final project, build/create that magical object. Prerequisites: None.

  • Sherry Kramer | SP2014 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRA2116.01
  • Sherry Kramer | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRA2116.01
  • Sherry Kramer | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | DRA2116.01
  • Sherry Kramer | SP2011 | Th, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA2116.01

Visual Art Research

Japanese Subculture Studies

Conducted through research that focuses on the development of Japanese subcultures in the post World War II period, this course poses various critical inquiries about their effects on contemporary global consumer society and the production of art. Research projects will be focused on the cultural and socio-political underpinnings of manga, anime, consumer goods, J-pop, and street fashion. This is a cross-disciplinary studio art class. Students are required to develop a project that includes a visual component based on reading and research material collected throughout the term. Prerequisites: Two advanced level 4000 visual art courses or permission of the instructor. Completion of one project level course preferred.

  • Yoko Inoue | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | VAR4102.01

Manga Into Art: After Super Flat

Japanese comic book images have become integrated into our contemporary art context. While investigating the social systems that can be found in the various genres of manga and within the cultural specificities of the post World War II era, this course explores the relationship of Manga and fine art. This is a research based studio art class and requirements include weekly readings on the history of Japanese subcultures, their socio-political context, and Japanese contemporary art theory. Various studio assignments focus on composition, serial images, movement and narrative, collage and assemblage, and use of text. This is not a manga making technique class. Prerequisites: one drawing or painting 2000 level class.

  • Yoko Inoue | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VAR4101.01